All I Want For Christmas // Book Review

Synopsis
“This sweet and magical romance about a girl who has just one wish–someone to kiss under the mistletoe–is the perfect holiday escape!”


In the book, our main character, Bailey, is a teenager girl, that only wants one thing for Christmas – a boyfriend. She is consumed with having a Holiday romance, but I think she has watched far too many Hallmark movies. She did admit to loving those movies. Don’t get me wrong, as a teenager, I too was eagerly hoping for a boyfriend. But Bailey came off desperate and boy-crazy. Also, I want to make one thing clear. I too love Hallmark movies, despite how cheesy they tend to be.

Bailey tries hard to come off as a holiday addict, but not being in a relationship made her more of a ‘Holiday Grinch’. Listen, being single isn’t the end of the world. Bailey acted as though a holiday romance would magically make the season better. Truthfully, relationships are hard work, and during the holidays, you should focus on making memories with the ones you love.

In the first chapter, not only are we introduced to Jacob Marley (yep that’s his real name). Can you get any more cliché? After meeting Jacob, and Bailey being outright rude to him, I could already tell where the story was going to go. Sure, Bailey was starting to feel something for Jacob, but she kept making him out to be someone he wasn’t. If I were Jacob, I would have never even given her the time of day.

I thought that this was an enemies-to-lovers YA contemporary, but then Bailey meets Charlie. He is a charming British boy, which does make him more appealing than Jacob. Why are accents so attractive? Nevertheless, I was very bothered by the fact that Bailey was suddenly all about Charlie – way too quickly. She barely knew him, but already thought he was her boyfriend. Honestly, Bailey came off as immature, vain, and argumentative. And, all readers know that disliking the MC makes for a less than enjoyable reading experience.

“I’ve watched more than my fair share of Hallmark Christmas movies, and even though I’m not a big-city lawyer who has moved back to my hometown to save the family business or a world-weary writer who falls in love with a recently widowed baker, I still believe in the power of Christmas Magic.”

Frankly, a lot of the time I felt that the plot was going nowhere. I didn’t even know what was going to happen throughout a vast majority of the book. However, the book is under 250 pages, so it is a very quick read. I finished it in two days, yet I didn’t find the story to be particularly interesting.

As for the ending, I was blown away with how ridiculous it was. I could see what was going to happen before it did and I was still floored. The fact that the author went this route was comical. One small spoiler about the ending – think ‘The Bishop’s Wife’ meets ‘It’s A Wonderful Life’.

Overall, I don’t regret reading this book. but feel that it was a waste of time. Maybe it is meant for a younger audience, since I could see tweens and young teenagers liking the story. The writing style wasn’t terrible, but as I said before it was a little juvenile. I wouldn’t recommend this book unless you want to read something that will make you roll your eyes.

Before you go, give this post a like and share. If you want to spread some love, please give my little blog a quick follow. And, don’t forget to leave a comment below!

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

It’s Kind Of A Funny Story // Book Review

Synopsis
“Ned Vizzini, who himself spent time in a psychiatric hospital, has created a remarkably moving tale about the sometimes unexpected road to happiness.”


This book gives a realistic look at mental illness. The main character, Craig, is relatable and still trying to figure out his mental state. Although he is a teenager, I think even adults can relate to his thoughts and feelings. Dealing with mental illness can be complex and the author does a great job of showcasing that. Like Craig, sometimes we feel fine due to medication, but once we stop taking that medication, we crash.

The book’s main plot centers on Craig being committed to the hospital’s adult psych ward. There, we are introduced to all sorts of characters, who are struggling with different mental health issues. It truly shows that everyone is facing their own battle. And mental Illnesses doesn’t look the same for everyone. On the outside, Craig seemed like an average teenager. But inside, he was crumbling. Some people are tied together with a smile.

There were many funny moments, which is nice to have in a book that deals with such a heavy topic. It was good to see Craig bonding with other patients. He learned a lot about their lives and struggles. But, there was also the notion that what happens in inpatient, should stay in inpatient.

There are many messages through the book. One being that you can’t truly understand mental health issues, even if you deal with them yourself. No two mental illnesses look the same. There will be people who think they have you figured out, but they don’t, and this was the case for Craig.

“I didn’t want to wake up. I was having a much better time asleep. And that’s really sad. It was almost like a reverse nightmare, like when you wake up from a nightmare you’re so relieved. I woke up into a nightmare.”

You never need to explain yourself to others, and that was something Craig struggled with in the story. His friends were toxic, and don’t even get me started on Nina, his crush. Craig had a lot of personal development in the book, and learned that it is better to be friendless than to be friends with all the wrong people.

One of my favorite things about this book was that it mentions “finding your anchor”. It is so important for us to find something that fills us with joy. That one things that tethers us to life. It shouldn’t be a person, but something that we enjoy. And the book made a point to talk about how we all should look for some type of anchor.

As you can tell, the book hits on some heavy topics. Obviously, mental health is the main focus in the book but there is talk about self harm, somewhat slut shaming, and the underlying mention of sexual abuse. If these are subjects you are sensitive to, please be aware before you pick this book up.

Overall, this is one of my favorite books. I connect with it, and love the view that all we can do is try to manage our lives. And to live the best life for ourselves. Please like and share this post, and follow my blog.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

The Holiday Swap // Book Review

Synopsis
“A feel-good, holiday-themed romantic comedy about identical twins who switch lives in the days leading up to Christmas–perfect for fans of Christina Lauren’s In a Holidaze and Josie Silver’s One Day in December.”


Mark my words – this will be a Hallmark Christmas movie one day. I have seen many Hallmark, movies and this book follows the exact same format. Small town, unexpected romance, and the rest is history. Don’t get me wrong, I am in no way complaining about the predictable plot. In fact, I found the book quiet enjoyable.

In the book, we follow two twin sisters – workaholic Charlie, and shy Cas. The sisters decide to trade places after an accident leaves Charlie unable to do her job as a food competition judge. I found the sisters to be likable, but I don’t think there was enough character development. Honestly, we learned more about Cas than Charlie, but still not enough to get super attached to the character.

As I mentioned, Charlie is a host and judge on a Food Network type competition show. She is competing as well – against her co-host, for a permanent position on the Network. There is talk about being a female in the TV food industry, and how we females aren’t taken seriously. Sometimes we are excepted to stand still and look pretty. I found this subject matter a nice addition to the book, but the competition itself didn’t play a big plot in the story.

Upon switching with Cas, Charlie must return home to her family bakery in her quaint mountain hometown. Why does it’s always have to be a small town? And, a bakery or bookshop. Anyways, I found that Charlie didn’t take her position as Cas very serious. While on the other hand Cas was doing everything she could to help Charlie keep her job.

As for the romance aspect, the love interests were very obvious. You could tell from early on how the romances were going to play out. There was some instant love at play, which I don’t generally care for, but that is typical in a Hallmark movie type of story. Both the love interests were nice characters, but I found myself liking Charlie’s love interest, Jake, more.

“Time heals all things. If time fails, try cake.”

The sisters kept wondering if the guys liked them for them or the role they were playing. They would go back and forth on whether or not to come clean, which was slightly annoying. It’s not like the guys could blow up their plan. Honestly, the switch idea as a whole was a bit immature. However, I found lying to someone while also getting close to them to be even more immature.

By the end of the book, you could see that Cas and Charlie had grown as people. Although, I do think the author put more thought into Cas’ character growth. Still, the twins ended up forming a strong sister bond that wasn’t really there before. Most of all, the story shows that it is never too late to change your life in a way that makes you truly happy.

Overall, I found the book to be a cute and cliché read, which is usually how I feel about any TV romance movie. This book is certainly not for everyone, because there really isn’t much depth to the story. You jump right into the plot and you can basically figure out how the book is going to play out right way.

Yet, I enjoyed not only the storyline, but the easy writing style as well. My only major con is that the book isn’t very Christmasey. You’d think a holiday book would have thrown in a little more of the holidays. Give me Christmas overload! Nevertheless, I did loved that there was a time jump epilogue. In the comments, let me know your thoughts on this book. Don’t forget to hit the follow button before you go.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

All Of Us Villains // Book Review

Synopsis
“The blockbuster co-writing debut of Amanda Foody and Christine Lynn Herman, All of Us Villains begins a dark tale of ambition and magick. You fell in love with the victors of The Hunger Games. Now, prepare to meet the villains of the Blood Veil.”


When I read the synopsis, I assumed that I would be getting a ‘Hunger Games’ type of story. And, while there are similarities to ‘The Hunger Games’, the books differ dramatically when it comes to the main storyline. This book is all about magic and there was a lot of focus on world building. The authors went in-depth to explain the magic system, but I was still confused by the magic aspect.

In this book, we follow 4 characters: Briony, Alastair, Isobel, and Gavin. The characters are the chosen ones amongst their families to participate in this magical fight to the death. Honestly, I think the battle must be done because of some sort of curse. However, I don’t think the whole history behind this competition was explained well enough.

The main four are from different classes in society, and each have their reasons to win the battle. Obviously, they don’t want to die, but they also want to make their families proud. But I found their families to be rather cold and heartless. Alastair’s family is very well known in the magic world, and he has a lot of pressure to live up to his families reputation. He was my favorite character of all, and I found myself sympathizing with him.

Isobel was forced into the battle. You could tell that her family only cared if she won, despite knowing that she might end up dying. She was the typical ‘pretty girl’, which I didn’t care for. I could tell that she and Alastair were going to be romantically linked, but I found their relationship boring, and it didn’t add anything to the story. It would have been more interesting if they developed a brother/sister type of bond instead.

“What is happily ever after to the child is a nightmare to the monster.”

Briony’s character was strong and smart. I could compare her to Katniss in some ways. She was, to me, the most likeable of the characters. She did make some bad decisions, but was honored to be a part of the competition. You get to see her grow throughout the book, and a lot of her opinions changed. I think that she got a bad rap from the other characters, because of her past actions.

As for Gavin, I wanted to like him, but he was very whiny. He blamed Alastair for all his problems. He was cold and ruthless, which is what he accused other of being. I didn’t find his chapters to be all that interesting. Each of the characters made decisions that had dire consequences, and there was a lot of manipulation going on.

There weren’t many side characters, since the authors wanted to focus on those core four. I think there is a lot of things happening in the story, and because of that, they chose not to have any more characters that were developed in depth. Especially since the plot was heavily character driven.

One of the things the book lacked was action. We spent a good 60% of the book waiting for the competition to start. It left me bored and struggling to get through it. When the main plot is the magical battle, I want it not to take most of the book for it to start. I do, however, understand that we needed to get each character’s backstory in order to establish some sort of connection with them.

The ending mainly left me confused. I am completely unsure of what actually unfolded. Even going back and rereading the last chapter didn’t clear things up for me. Maybe this book went over my head, or there were just too many elements at play. For me, young adult fantasy is always a hit or miss type of genre.

Overall, this book isn’t something that I would read again. And, maybe should have DNF’ed it at the halfway mark. This is a duology, but I am unsure if I will be picking up the second book. In the comments, leave me your YA fantasy book recommendations. Don’t forget to follow my blog for more of my book reviews!

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

The Lucky List // Book Review

SynopsisEmily’s always been lucky. Well, technically her mum was the lucky one, and since she died, Emily’s started to feel like her luck’s run out. So when Emily finds her mum’s senior-year bucket list, she finds twelve ways to feel close to her again. But if she wants to check everything off, she’ll need help – help in the form of Blake. As Blake and Emily work through the list, the girls’ bond deepens. Emily is starting to feel lucky again, but she’s faced with the question: can she accept this new part of herself, the part her mum never even knew existed?


This isn’t a story that captured me right from the start, but I could tell that it would only get better. The main character, Emily, is going through a lot. She’s still coping with the passing of her mother., and trying to understand her feelings about grief, while trying to fix a mistake she made because of that grief.

Emily embarks on this journey to complete this list she found in her mother’s stuff. The author made a story about grief, into a story about self discovery. It made the subject not quite so heavy, but without glossing over the struggles of losing someone.

In the book, Emily starts bonding with the new girl, Blake. As they get closer, their feelings for each being to grow. The female/female romance was simple and sweet. Their relationship developed organically, and wasn’t rushed. Blake never pressured Emily into anything, and only wanted her to be happy.

Self love was a big part of the story, as quite a few of Emily’s decisions were based on what she thought her mother wanted for her. But the bucket list, of sorts, really did help her realize that sometimes you have to let heart take charge.

There was some focus on how we all grieve differently, but I wasn’t too found of the aspect. Emily’s dad was quick to “erase” his wife from their lives and move on. However, it was explained,that to him, her memory is what was more important. Her clothes and other things were just a reminder of what was lost.

“We’re all lucky,not because every thing works out, but we get to wake up in the morning and take chances and make mistakes and keep trying not to.”

I understand and respect the writer’s decisions to add that with in the story, but it made me angry all the same. However, it is true that once you are gone, you don’t leave things behind. Just people. As long as they don’t forget you, then you will always be with them.

Nevertheless, the story was well done, but slow at parts. I was hoping for more from it, which left me a bit disappointed. As for the the writing style, it was reminiscent of Sarah Dessen, who isn’t necessarily a writer I enjoy reading. I liked the way this story played out, so the writing didn’t bother me that much.

Overall, the plot was wrapped up with a nice little bow, and even with the topic of grief, there wasn’t too many heartbreaking moments. I would, of course, still recommend you go into the book knowing that loss is a major plot point of the story. Most of the book centers around the aftermath of losing a loved one.

In the comments, give me your thoughts on the book. Or, let me know if you have it on your TBR. As always, follow my blog, because it really brightens my day!

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

Kiki’s Delivery Service // Book Review

SynopsisThis is a charming and delightful tale that is reminiscent of children’s favorites The Worst Witch by Jill Murphy and Astrid Lindgren’s Adventures of Pippi Longstocking. Black and white line drawings sprinkled throughout reveal the humor and warmth in everything Kiki does.


I am not a big anime lover, but I have heard of the ‘Kiki’s Delivery Service‘ story before. When I discovered the book, I knew that I had to pick it up. The story follows a young witch named Kiki, who leaves her home to find her own path as a witch. I found Kiki to be a fairly typical young girl, aside from being a witch.

She is energetic, and excited to embark on this adventure. But, she has a tendency to think she is all grown up, and already has everything figured out. She is curious about normal tween things, like boys and love, and has big dreams. I see her being relatable for young girls.

Like most witches, she has a cat familiar named Gigi. I found Gigi to be entertaining and delightful. They balanced each other’s personalities, which was nice. Also, she adds a touch of humor to the story. I enjoyed those tiny funny parts a lot, and they added to my enjoyment of the book.

“How wonderful it is to have a place to return to.”

There weren’t a lot of side characters, but they were all very likable. That being said, they didn’t have a very large part in the story. As the title suggests, the book centers around Kiki, and follows her delivery adventures. Honestly, it felt like a collection of short stories. I didn’t mind this at all, since it made the book a quick read.

Overall, this is a cute witchy story that is perfect for younger readers. I would definitely classify it as a middle grade. There’s an underlying message, that some people pass judgement on others who they simply don’t understand. This is something that which holds very true in real life as well.

It was interesting to learn that the author’s inspiration for the story was a drawing her daughter made. She even loosely based Kiki off her daughter. I found that to be adorable. Reading the book made me want to watch the movie, because I hear that it closely follows the book. So, I think that I will enjoy it as well. Leave me a comment, letting me know if you have either read the book or seen the film. And hit that follow button to help grow my blog!

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

The Night Shift // Book Review

Synopsis
“From the author of the breakout thriller Every Last Fear, comes Alex Finlay’s electrifying next novel The Night Shift, about a pair of small-town murders fifteen years apart―and the ties that bind them.”


This is an adult mystery thriller book that will keep you on the edge of your seat. This is the definition of a page turner, because of the compelling story, twists and  versatile cast of characters. As the synopsis says, the book focuses on a crime that takes place at an ice cream shop in the present day. The incident resembles a murder from the 90’s that happened at a Blockbuster. Yes, I said Blockbuster Video. If you were a 90s, or even early 2000s, kid than you’re probably getting childhood flashbacks right about now.

The book follows three perspectives – Ella, Sarah, and Chris. Ella is the only survivor of the Blockbuster murders, who was asked to talk with the lone survivor of the current murders. Jesse. The girls do form a bond, because of their shared tragedies. However, Ella is a very messed up character. She doesn’t let people get too close, and tends to sabotage herself . The character of Ella was written so well, and she conveys that one can go on to have a good career, and decent life, after a horrible incident. However, the past will always haunt them and affect their life.

Chris is a public defender, and the younger brother of, Vincent, who was accused of he Blockbuster murder. Although Vincent was never charged for the crime, people still believe that he was involved. Everyone except Chris. The brothers haven’t seen each other in years, ever since Vincent up and disappeared. We don’t get to know much about Vincent, but the way Chris talked about him, you could tell that he wasn’t the murdering type. The boys came from an abusive home, and it made sense that Chris would turn his effort into helping people that needed help. I found him to just be a kid, waiting for his older brother to come back for him.

Sarah Keller is the FBI agent assigned to the case. She is pregnant, which was an interesting touch. She was giving me Olivia Benson vibes. Throughout a lot of the book, she is with Atticus Singh, who is her fresh out of college partner of the case. I liked Atticus and Sarah’s brother/sister type of relationship. However, Atticus quickly became my favorite character, even thought he played a rather small part in the story.

“The world breaks everyone and afterward many are strong at the broken places.”

There were a lot of facts in the story, which is why it was mainly plot driven. It was like watching an episode of ‘Cold Case’ where you are trying to fit all the pieces together in your head. You know the answer is right in front of you, but just can’t figure it out. Even with this being the case, the book doesn’t require a ton of focus or brain power. It was a fairly fast read, and the story didn’t slow down one bit.

There were so many twists that I couldn’t keep up. I was probably shocked for the majority of this book. And, with every new development, my theories changed. I was reeling by the killers reveal. It was insane, jaw dropping, and so well thought out. If you are looking for an author that knows how to write a solid mystery, then Alex Finlay is for you.

The book hit on some heavy topics, like how grief can drive a person to do despicable things. Losing a cherished loved one can make you lose yourself as well. The book will definitely take you on an emotional ride. The ending was not only amazing, but broke my heart in many ways. By the last page, I was in tears.

Overall, I wouldn’t call this a thriller. Rather, an amazing murder/mystery. There were some badass female characters, but also many triggering topics. I would recommend looking at the trigger warnings for the book before picking it up. In the comments, let me know if you have read this book. Please give my blog a follow, because your support does mean the world to me!

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

As Good As Dead // Book Review


Synopsis
“She’s used to online death threats in the wake of her viral true-crime podcast, but she can’t help noticing an anonymous person who keeps asking her: Who will look for you when you’re the one who disappears? Soon the threats escalate and Pip realizes that someone is following her in real life.”


*This review might include information that some might see as a spoiler.*

Before I get started, I would like to mentally prepare you for a rant filled, and quite lengthy, review. (Although most of my reviews do seem to be pretty long). This is the third and final book in the ‘Good Girl’s Guide To Murder’ series – and when I say it was a disappointment, I mean it was a complete and utter fail! I was positively enraged by this book. So much so, that I don’t even want to write about it.

Nevertheless, here we are. The book takes place right after the second installment. So, if you have yet to read the second book, please be aware of spoilers. Pip is struggling with PTSD, which she isn’t actually dealing with at all. She has turned to using drugs, and insists on carrying the weight of the aftermath of ‘Good Girl, Bad Blood’ all by herself. It is clear that Pippa has changed in so many ways. Not only was her drug use shocking, she was a much darker version of herself.

For someone that seems so smart, she was totally blind to her self destructive behavior. And similarly, to to the fact that the only way to move past trauma is to deal with it head on. The rest of the characters stayed practically the same, and Ravi was both supportive and protective of Pip.

What makes this book so different than the previous two, is that the case involves Pippa herself. Before this, we have seen her trying to solve mysteries for others. This time, she is the target. The big question of the book is, “Who will look for you, when it’s you who goes missing”? It is a very interesting question, and, I think we all have our own answer to it.

The key to these books is that you have to remember all the little details. This final book connects all the books together. It is seriously a full circle moment. I loved how everything tied in together. Also, how Andy Bell had a nice redemption arc.

“All these ambiguities, these contradictions, these grey areas that spread and engulfed all sense – how could Pip rectify that? How could she cure herself from the after effects?”

This case follows a serial killer, rather than a solo murder – think of a Criminal Minds sort of case. However, the plot was none too thrilling to me. Also, it was strange to see Ravi being more involved in the case, and being smarter than Pippa at times.

I had many suspicions as to the killer, but kept bouncing around. Still, my first instinct was ultimately correct. And, by the halfway point, the book picked up the pace. It was an intense roller coaster ride from that point forward. However, right as the story got good, I was completely in shock as to what I was actually reading. I didn’t even recognize these characters. It was as if Pippa had no moral compass at all. And, everyone was so quick to jump right on board with her.

It was insane – I wanted to throw the book in the trash. I was livid! Okay, maybe I’m overreacting. But this book was unnecessary, and the characters developed in the worst way possible. I understand not trusting the justice system, but Murder, then framing someone else for that murder? Come on. Let’s face it, Pippa’s actions in this book prove that PTSD is the least of her issues.

However, something that I do love is that Holly Jackson’s book are easy to get into. She has a style of writing that I have become a fan of. And, as I have mentioned multiple time that even though the book got my blood boiling I couldn’t stop reading.

Overall, I wasn’t very satisfied with the the conclusion of the book or the trilogy altogether. My favorite book would have to be the first in the series, with book two being a close second. It really should have been a duology. However, I have noticed that this book has polarized opinions – you either love it, or you hate it. There really isn’t any middle ground. Can you guess which team I’m on?

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

Good Girl, Bad Blood // Book Review


Synopsis
Jamie Reynolds has disappeared, on the very same night the town hosted a memorial for the sixth-year anniversary of the deaths of Andie Bell and Sal Singh. The police won’t do anything about it. And if they won’t look for Jamie then Pip will, uncovering more of her town’s dark secrets along the way… and this time everyone is listening. But will she find him before it’s too late?


The first book in this trilogy was fantastic, so I was eager to jump into second book. Unfortunately, I had forgotten a lot of the characters from the first book, so it made this book a bit of a challenging read. However, I did find an overview of ‘A Good Girl’s Guide To Murder’ at Recaptains.

Unlike the first book, I wasn’t captivated from the start. I wasn’t sure about the whole friend’s missing brother plot. A missing persons case is very different from a murder/mystery. Still, Pippa is a fearless protagonist with a curious personality. Even with her reservations about taking on another potentially dangerous case, she can’t say no. It’s like they say: “A tiger can’t change it’s stripes”.

Although, the mystery was interesting, and I was enjoying all the twists, the plot wasn’t as thrilling as the previous book. But as the plot progressed, the pace picked up, and the story continued to get better. For me, a part of the reason I wasn’t as engaged as I thought I’d be, is that I felt like Pippa had changed since the first book. But, that is to be expected, given the life and death situation that she went through.

In this book, Pippa and Ravi are in a relationship, but I am unsure of how I feel about them being together. They had cute moments, but I didn’t sense a ton of chemistry between them. That aside, I do think they work well together. Ravi is very supportive of Pip’s inquisitive nature, while still being protective of her.

There was this new podcast element, and a lot more social media references. There are mentions of Instagram and Tinder. Authors tend to love throwing in bits of the real world like that, Maybe to connect with their readers more?

By the halfway point, I couldn’t put the book down. I felt like Pip. Trying to piece everything together, and my suspicions were even right a few times. And, when everything unfolded at the end, I was shocked, but not surprised at where the story went.

“I think we all get to decide what good and bad and right and wrong mean to us, not what we’re told to accept. You did nothing wrong. Don’t beat yourself up for other people’s mistakes.”

There was a lot of talk about the justice system, and how it fails more often than not. I think the justice system isn’t always so black and white. The way this book handles right and wrong is very powerful. It is an interesting take on justice and makes you take a closer look at your own beliefs.

The ending was incredibly sad, and begs the topics of what makes a victim. Should the sins of our parents become ours as well? By the end of the book, I sympathized with both the killer and victim. The ending was done so well, and was very thought provoking. In fact, the entire book will leave you with a lot to think about.

This book does show how much hypocrites people can be. It is always interesting to see just how easily people can turn on others. This is a real life thing, and makes you wonder why the world is full of so many judgmental individuals. Do genuine friends even exist?

Overall, I found it to be a great sequel. The storyline didn’t disappoint me one bit, and my reading experience was a positive one. Give this post a quick like and a share before you go. Also, did you know you could follow my blog? That really does help it grow, and reassures me that you like my content.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

Heartstopper // Book Review

Synopsis
Charlie and Nick are at the same school, but they’ve never met … until one day when they’re made to sit together. They quickly become friends, and soon Charlie is falling hard for Nick, even though he doesn’t think he has a chance. But love works in surprising ways, and Nick is more interested in Charlie than either of them realized.


If you’re in the mood for a cute male/male romance, then look no further. This is the first book in a graphic novel series. It follows two teenage boys that end up falling for each other. They start off as friends, but their relationship continues to grow throughout the story. You can see their attraction growing right before your eyes.

The book is fairly lighthearted, but it slightly touches on consent. Charlie is an openly gay over-thinker, which was fun to read about. He is likable, and I could see why Nick was drawn to him. Nick is a rugby-player with a kind heart. Honestly, him and Charlie make an unlikely pair, but one that fits together nicely.

Sexual confusion is a part of the plot, since Nick is unsure about his feelings for Charlie. Being someone who has never been attracted to boys, he doesn’t understand this newfound connection. He even goes as far to search if he’s gay on Google. Let’s me be completely transparent here –  Google can tell you a lot of things, but not how you feel about somebody else. That part is up to you.

“You can’t tell whether people are gay by what they look like. And gay or straight aren’t the only two options.”

Another great point the story makes, is that you don’t need to put a label on yourself.  But it’s  still okay to label yourself anyway. These days, the focus is on telling people that they don’t need labels, which is amazing. Still, we should make the same effort to let others know that it’s fine to define yourself and your relationship. If you want to, that is

The book talks about the important issues, but in such a fun and easy going way, which is exactly what young people need. They don’t make them a huge focus in the story, but just enough to get the point across.

The is a fast read and a easy one as well. Before you know it you’re at the last page. Alice Osmen has a way of drawing you in with her writing and storytelling. Her book ‘Radio Silence’ is just as amazing. The ending of this book makes you want to keep reading Charlie and Nick’s story.

Overall, I understand all the hype behind these books. And, I hear the Netflix series adaptation is wonderful. However, I am not the biggest graphic novel fan, but the book was so fast paced that I will most likely finish the series. In the comments, let me know what you thought of Charlie and Nick’s love story. As always, you can support my blog by giving it a follow.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny