Asking For A Friend | Book Review

About The Book
Juliana Zhao, confident in her expertise on love and her chance to win the Asian Americans in Business Competition, is forced to team up with her frenemy, Garrett Tsai, after her partner drops her. As they clash over their dating advice column, Juliana starts questioning her priorities and the sacrifices she’s made. With the competition intensifying, she must decide if winning is worth it.
Buy The Book: https://amzn.to/3y90Apd

My Rating


*I want to thank the author, publisher, and NetGalley for providing me with an ARC of this book. However, please know that my reviews are 100% honest and reflect my own thoughts.*

This is an interesting book to explain because it is so much more than a romance and even a love advice column as the synopsis suggests. That isn’t a bad thing, but there are many layers to the story. It dives deep into the complexities of family expectations, personal growth, and the cultural pressures faced by its characters. To me, this multi-faceted approach makes the book stand out in the crowded YA genre.

The main protagonist, Julianna, is always trying to live up to her mother’s high expectations and standards. She tries not to make waves like her older, disowned sister Bella, or her younger sister Hattie, who isn’t shy about questioning their mother. Her goal is to win the Asian Americans in Business Competition started by her deceased father, get into an Ivy League school, and become a success. This relentless pursuit of perfection adds a lot of tension and depth to her character.

I loved how Julianna’s thoughts and plans evolved throughout the book. Her character development was remarkable. Her relationship with Garrett, her former childhood friend, was especially touching because they both understood each other, despite their different struggles. Their reconnection felt genuine, and you could see them growing from friends into something more.

“I wanted the days when I didn’t even know what it was to think of the future.”

This book really focuses on Taiwanese culture and the type of pressure that, I assume, many Asian children have put on them. However, it was nice that the author showcased that not all Asian families hold their children to such high standards and let them make their own choices without judgment. This gave a clearer and more detailed view of cultural expectations.

The writing in this book was a pleasant surprise because, for a YA novel, it didn’t feel too juvenile. In my opinion, the story was well thought out, and there were no moments when the characters seemed immature. The reasoning behind Julianna and Garrett’s falling out was very realistic and understandable, which I appreciated.

Overall, I was surprised by the heavier and sadder parts of the plot. I expected the book to focus more on the advice column, but it turned out to be about following your own advice and figuring out what you want from life. I think many teens, especially those in the Asian community, can relate to this story. I also love a story with an epilogue, and this one wrapped things up nicely.

In the comments, let me know if this book is on your TBR and whether you think you give good advice. Don’t forget to like and share this post with others. As always, please hit the follow button before you go.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

Flawless | Book Review

About The Book
The rules were simple: keep my hands off my agent’s daughter and stay out of trouble. Now, I’m stuck with her as my “full-time supervision” to clean up my image after a scandal. But Summer isn’t just a babysitter—she sees the real me and doesn’t run away. She insists on boundaries to protect her heart and my reputation, but I’m determined to steal her heart anyway.
Buy The Book: https://amzn.to/3SirK3I

My Rating


This is the first book in the Chestnut Springs series, an adult romance series of interconnected standalone novels. The series is also a favorite among KU readers. I believe all the books are set in the same small town and are cowboy romances. In this one, we get Summer and Rhett’s love story. With all the hype surrounding these books, I was expecting more.

I’m not exactly sure how to classify the tropes for this book, so we’ll go with workplace romance and good girl/bad boy. Rhett, a successful bull rider, is having a PR crisis, and Summer, his agent’s daughter, is essentially tasked with babysitting him for a few weeks.

Summer is a daddy’s girl who doesn’t love her job but feels like she owes it to her father to work for him. She has a complicated relationship with her stepmother and half-sister, while Rhett is close to his brothers, nephew and dad. It was awesome to watch him interact with his family because of how close they all were.

“You wear the hat, you ride the cowboy.”

Unfortunately, unlike many people, I wasn’t a fan of the storyline in this book or the couple. Summer was decent enough, but I felt like her romance with Rhett was very insta-lovey. Rhett wasn’t my favorite male protagonist because he could be self-centered at times. He would do everything he wanted under the pretense that he was doing it in the best interest of the people he loved.

I’ve learned that I’m not into the “touch her and you die” type of masculinity, which was definitely the kind of relationship Summer and Rhett had. Also, the smutty scenes in this book were very cringey. I don’t know what the author was thinking with some of her phrasing, and as someone who enjoys spice, these scenes were, to put it nicely, poorly written. However, I will say that the book is probably a 3.5 out of 5 on the spice scale, and the sexual scenes are very detailed.

Overall, this book wasn’t something I truly enjoyed. But Elsie Silver does have a great writing style, spicy scenes aside. I found the book to be extremely bingeable, and with this book introducing you to the main characters from the other books, I am very excited to read their stories. I am particularly interested in learning more about Winter, who is Summer’s half-sister. Although I don’t think this book is anything special, I will be continuing the series.

In the comments, let me know if the books get better as the series goes on. Don’t forget to like and share this post with other readers. Before you go, give the blog a follow so that I know you enjoy this type of content.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

The Last Time I Lied | Book Review

About The Book
Fifteen years after her friends vanished at Camp Nightingale, Emma, now an artist still haunted by their disappearance, is invited back to the camp as an instructor. Despite her fears, she returns to the camp, finding it eerily unchanged except for a new security camera outside her former cabin. As she uncovers clues about her friends’ disappearance, Emma risks everything for the truth, facing potentially deadly consequences.
Buy The Book: https://amzn.to/3SgRAVR

My Rating


‘The Last Time I Lied’ by Riley Sager is a book that had me hooked right from the start. The plot instantly kicks off and grabs your attention. We follow our main character, Emma, who is haunted by an event that took place fifteen years ago at Camp Nightingale. Her three older cabin mates went missing, but Emma has some secrets of her own—things she still feels guilty about today.

The plot revolves not only around the mystery of what happened to Emma’s three cabin mates but also Emma’s mission to gain answers and closure when the owner of the camp invites her back to be the art teacher for the camp’s reopening. I wouldn’t say that Emma is an unreliable narrator, but she was a teenager when all of this took place, so her memory isn’t the best.

One of my biggest problems with the book—and probably the only issue I had with it—was Emma’s character. I felt as if she still acted like she was 13. She wasn’t a very savvy protagonist. Also, the fact that she still had somewhat of a crush on Theo, the camp owner’s son, years later was a little weird. But nothing like your first crush who you accused of murder, right?

“Everything is a game, Em. Whether you know it or not. Which means that sometimes a lie is more than just a lie. Sometimes it’s the only way to win.”

The summertime vibes were definitely on point in this book, and it really gave me that chilling summer mystery feel. For me, it was more of a mystery than a thriller. It definitely isn’t a book that’s going to keep you up at night, but I did enjoy the dual timeline where we get chapters of the past, seeing Emma’s relationships with her cabin mates, especially Vivian, who is the alpha female of the group.

The thing that I think Riley Sager does best is shocking twists. Most of the time, I feel like their books are going to be four stars, but by the end chapter, I am left completely shocked and have to add an extra half star. They write these mysteries where I have no clue where the story is going, and I don’t even try to guess.

Overall, this was such a fun summer mystery thriller that I think a lot of readers will enjoy. I can safely say that Riley Sager has not only become one of my favorite authors, but they are now an auto-buy author for me. I will absolutely read any book they release.

In the comments, let me know if you have read any books by Riley Sager. If you are a fan of mystery, thriller, or horror books, hit the follow button so that you never miss a post.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

Weather Girl | Book Review

About The Book
TV meteorologist Ari Abrams and sports reporter Russell Barringer team up to reunite their divorced bosses. Ari, fascinated by weather and optimistic despite her mentor’s distractions, finds solace in Russell’s understanding. Their scheme to mend their bosses’ relationship with secret gifts and double dates leads to unexpected chemistry between them. As they work together, Ari must decide if Russell will accept all facets of her personality, including those she keeps hidden.
Buy The Book: https://amzn.to/4ckeLqz

My Rating


As someone who’s been weather-obsessed since I was a teen, a romance about a TV meteorologist sounded perfect for me. However, this book wasn’t quite what I expected. The story moved slower than I anticipated, and it dealt with heavier topics than your typical romantic comedy.

The main character, Ari, is shy and had a tough childhood. She has clinical depression but tries to hide it with a super sunny and optimistic attitude, which is both sweet and heartbreaking. Watching her handle her inner struggles while keeping up her cheerful front gave her character more depth, which I really appreciated.

The romance in the book revolves around Ari, the meteorologist, and Russell, the sports reporter. It kicks off with them plotting to “Parent Trap” their bosses to fix their toxic workplace. Even though the setup was unique, it was obvious from the start that Ari and Russell liked each other. Their mutual attraction was clear, making it a bit frustrating but also relatable that they didn’t see each other’s feelings right away.

“Weather connects us. A shared experience, even when we aren’t in the same place.”

The romance between Ari and Russell was super cute. Their personal struggles made the main conflict feel very real. I liked Solomon’s writing style, but the plot and romance weren’t anything special. The story was predictable but still enjoyable—it just didn’t stick with me like some other romance novels.

What really stood out in the book was how it handled depression. Solomon did a great job showing what living with depression is like and how it’s always present. The raw, heartfelt conversations between Ari and her mom about depression were especially moving and added a lot of emotional depth to the story.

Overall, this is a nice, easy romance read. The plot might be a bit bland for some, but it’s fun and touching. There are a few spicy moments, so it’s not entirely closed-door, but nothing too intense. I’m glad I read it, though I don’t think it will stick with me long term.

Let me know in the comments what your favorite type of weather is! I’m a snow day kind of girl—there’s nothing better than cozying up with a cup of hot coffee and a good book while the snow falls. And before you leave, hit the follow button so you never miss a post!

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

Happy Place | Book Review

About The Book
Harriet and Wyn, once the perfect couple, now navigate their unspoken breakup during their annual Maine getaway with friends. They pretend everything’s fine as they share a cottage soon to be sold, concealing their lingering desire for each other. Amid cheese, wine, and coastal air, they play the role of ‘happy couple’ to spare their friends’ feelings. Can they maintain the facade for a final week among those who know them best?
Buy The Book: https://amzn.to/4eHcmHV

My Rating


I dove into this book with high expectations. Despite hearing mixed reviews, I had a feeling I’d love it—and I did. This is surprising since second chance romances usually aren’t my thing, but this one hooked me completely. Honestly, I don’t know what it was about this story but I was wholeheartedly invested in it.

The story centers on Harriet and Wyn, college sweethearts who broke off their engagement six months ago. They’re forced to pretend they’re still together on a trip with their college friends. What follows is a love story that’s both romantic and heartbreaking, and it had me in tears more than once.

But the romance is just one part of this amazing book. It also explores themes of friendship and growing up. We see a close-knit group of friends who, instead of growing apart, are simply growing up. As they transition out of their twenties and start new chapters in their lives, each one faces the future while striving to maintain the strong friendships and family they have built.

“Love means constantly saying you’re sorry, and then doing better.”

The book shows that friendships don’t have to disappear but can change as life changes. Harriet always talks about her “Happy Place,” this little cottage in Maine where the book takes place. But as her character develops throughout the book, she realizes that happiness isn’t a place—it’s the people you’re with.

The characters, especially Harriet and Wyn, felt so real. Their relationship issues were portrayed authentically, and I could feel their heartache. Harriet’s complicated feelings about love, influenced by her family, made their story even more touching. Wyn’s struggles with depression were crucial to their relationship story. I loved how the author emphasized that love doesn’t have to be perfect because flawed love and people are the most precious.

Overall, this book truly resonated with me. It might not appeal to everyone, especially if you’re in your teens or early twenties, but as someone in my thirties, it really struck a chord. It helped me appreciate my own relationships more and kept me engaged until the final page. This is how you nail a second chance romance. Just a heads-up: you might need some tissues handy while you’re reading it.

If you’ve read this book, let me know what you think in the comments. Don’t forget to like and share this post, and follow the blog so you never miss an update!

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

Red, White, and Blue Books // July 4th Reading

Hi Friends,
In honor of the 4th of July holiday, I wanted to share some red, white, and blue books. These might not be my all-time favorite books in these colors, but they are definitely ones worth checking out. I know this post isn’t the most original, but I love recommending books I’ve enjoyed. I hope you might find joy in them too!


Buy The Book

‘Summer’s Edge’ By Dana Mele
I am going to be upfront and admit that this isn’t truly a favorite of mine, but I think the concept of this book is really cool. It’s a queer young adult paranormal thriller that takes place during the summer. Although I had my issues with it, I do think that it is a pretty decent summer thriller. Also, it is compared to *I Know What You Did Last Summer*, which, if you are a horror movie fan, takes place during July 4th.
Related Post: Summer’s Edge // Book Review


Buy The Book

‘A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder’ By Holly Jackson
I really wanted to give out new recommendations, but when it came to a white book, the only one that stood out was *A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder*. I’m not going to rave about it too much since it is a widely popular YA mystery book, but this is such a good, fast-paced mystery with great characters and an interesting storyline.
Related Post: A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder // Book Review


Buy The Book

‘How Not to Fall in Love’ By Jacqueline Firkins
This is a blue book that I think is underrated. It is a young adult friends-to-lovers romance. I found it to be so cute, and it has the exchange of service plot that I adore. The plot follows Harper, who tries to teach her hopeless romantic best friend Theo how not to fall in love with every girl they go out with. I read this book really fast, so if you’re looking for a quick and cute read, you should definitely give this book a chance.
Related Post: How Not to Fall in Love // Book Review


There you have three recommendations for books to read this 4th of July. These books might not take place during the summer holiday, but they are still good reads nonetheless. Before you leave, hit the follow button so that you get notified whenever there’s a new post.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

The Love Hypothesis // Book Review

About The Book
As a reluctant Ph.D. candidate, Olive Smith’s skepticism about love is challenged when she pretends to date Adam Carlsen, a notorious professor, to satisfy her best friend’s expectations. Despite Adam’s reputation, he unexpectedly supports Olive during a chaotic science conference, sparking an unexpected attraction. As their fake relationship blurs into something real, Olive navigates the complexities of love and her academic career, discovering that both require more than just scientific proof.
Buy The Book: https://amzn.to/3Wf0fe9

My Rating


I was very unsure about this book before picking it up. All I knew was that there was a lot of hype surrounding it and that it was a STEM-based romance. Although I love reading adult romance books, I had never read a book with a STEM aspect. However, after giving it a chance and getting through the first ten chapters, I found myself truly enjoying the book. Therefore, if you are struggling with the book, try to give it until at least the halfway point.

The plot follows Olive, a Ph.D. candidate who initiates a fake dating relationship with Adam Carlsen, a well-known young professor. The book includes the fake dating trope and a grumpy-sunshine romance. Although everything happens a bit too quickly at first—Olive literally jumps Adam in the first chapter—I am glad that the story slowed down as it continued.

Olive’s character was likable, and it was understandable that she had a difficult time letting people in. However, I am not a fan of characters who cannot see what is right in front of them. Adam was an amazing love interest, but I might just have a thing for no-nonsense male characters. The chemistry between the two characters is evident, and there is just the right amount of witty banter between them.

“That’s the thing with science. We’re drilled to believe that false positives are bad, but false negatives are just as terrifying.”

As for spiciness, I would not say that it is all too steamy. However, it is not a closed-door romance. I would give it a spicy rating of 2.5 out of 5. The one sexy scene the author gave us is perfect for someone who wants a predominantly clean romance with a touch of spice. In my opinion, it is nothing that will make you blush, but it is a descriptive scene.

One of my favorite aspects of the book was the focus on how women in STEM are treated. The author did a great job showcasing how they are not taken seriously in the field. Sadly, this is true in reality, as it is mainly a male-dominated career path. Thus, the book shows that we need more women in the STEM world. I enjoyed this deeper element of the plot.

Overall, the writing style was fantastic, and the plot was enjoyable. If you don’t mind the miscommunication third-act break plot device when it’s done well, then this is the book for you. It was a fun read and serves as a great palate cleanser between heavier books. I look forward to reading more from this author and agree that this book is worth the hype.

In the comments, let me know if you have read this book or anything else by the author. Don’t forget to like and share this post with other book lovers. If you are a fan of book reviews, hit the follow button so you never miss a post.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

A Game Most Foul // Book Review

About The Book
Attending Ashford College’s writing seminar in London, Jules Montgomery faces challenges with her recent hearing loss and writer’s block. When a fellow student disappears and authorities show little concern, Jules teams up with new friends Percy and Suruthi. Together, aided unexpectedly by a man claiming to be Sherlock Holmes, they unravel mysteries both modern and from fiction, discovering truths that defy time and perception.
Buy The Book: https://amzn.to/45ImL1T

My Rating


First, I’d like to extend a heartfelt thank you to the publisher, author, and NetGalley for granting me access to an audiobook ALC of “A Game Most Foul” by Alison Gervais. Going into this book, I wasn’t entirely sure what to expect. The premise of a young adult mystery with a Sherlock Holmes twist intrigued me, as I usually enjoy YA mysteries. However, I have mixed feelings about this one.

Let’s start with what I liked. The main character, Jules, is attending a writing workshop in the UK for the summer. Jules has tinnitus and uses hearing aids, which is a refreshing and important representation that’s rarely seen in books. The setting in London is always a plus for me; mysteries set there always seem more enjoyable to me. The plot about a missing classmate initially caught my interest, and I liked the small friend group Jules formed throughout the story.

However, the negatives outweighed the positives for me. Despite the intriguing premise, I found it hard to connect with Jules. It’s hard to pinpoint exactly why, but her intense interest in her classmate’s disappearance felt unnatural and a bit over-the-top. Additionally, the romance subplot seemed unnecessary and added little to the main story.

“There’s a story somewhere in my brain, maybe a mystery or a thriller, needing to be written.”

II didn’t expect Sherlock and Watson’s inclusion to be done the way it was. The supernatural element, while somewhat well executed, surprised me and didn’t fit smoothly with the story. I enjoyed Sherlock’s character as it stayed true to the original portrayal. However, I found the other characters less likable, especially the teenagers, who seemed to be trying too hard to act grown-up. They didn’t feel realistic as teenagers; it was obvious that an adult was writing them.

My main problem was with the writing style. It seemed better suited for younger readers than for young adults. Maybe it’s just me getting older or having different tastes, but it made it hard for me to stay engaged in the story. Still, I have to give credit for the ending—it tied things up neatly, even though by then, I wasn’t as invested in the plot.

Overall, while the book has its moments and brings some valuable representation to the table, I just didn’t find the story compelling. It might be more appealing to younger readers or those new to YA mysteries, but it didn’t keep me fully engaged. Thanks again to the publisher, author, and NetGalley for letting me listen to the ALC.

Please comment if you’re an older reader who still enjoys YA books. And don’t forget to like, share, and follow the blog before you go!

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

Little Monsters // Book Review

About The Book
Kacey, the new girl in Broken Falls, moves in with her father and stepfamily, finding her new life eerily charming compared to her tumultuous past. She’s welcomed into a tight circle of friends, but things turn strange when her closest friends, Bailey and Jade, start acting distant. When Bailey disappears after a party, Kacey is left to navigate the town’s suspicions. Suddenly, Broken Falls isn’t so welcoming, and Kacey is at the center of the mystery.
Buy The Book: https://amzn.to/3Ry7tXE

My Rating


Kara Thomas has a way of writing that always keeps me engaged, and this book is no exception. The story centers on a high school senior, Kacey, as she tries to uncover the mystery behind the disappearance of one of her closest friends, all while grappling with her troubled past. She had a difficult childhood, and works to conceal her anger issues while living with her dad, stepmom, stepbrother, and half-sister.

What I liked most was how the story had many layers, not just the mystery. It made everything more interesting and complicated. The mystery itself moves really fast, and even though I didn’t always agree with what the main character did, it felt real. She made mistakes like any teenager would in that situation.

In the book, we mostly follow Kacey’s perspective, but we also get short chapters that are journal entries from her missing friend, Bailey. These were an unexpected, but pleasant, surprise. Furthermore, they really did enhance the story. Bailey’s chapters give us more insight into her character, and provide important details leading up to her disappearance.

“Hope is the most dangerous thing you can give someone.”

I kept changing my mind about who might be behind everything, which I loved. The author really makes you doubt everyone and throws in lots of surprises. Some twists totally caught me off guard, though I did figure out part of the ending eventually. But when everything was revealed, it was shocking and way darker than I expected—in a good way.

Overall, the writing is fantastic, and the ending is gripping. I could easily see this book being one that many readers finish in a single sitting. If you enjoy young adult mysteries, this is a must-read. Just a heads-up, though: it tackles some heavy stuff, so check for trigger warnings if you need to.

Let me know in the comments if you enjoy YA mysteries! For more book-related content, check out my Instagram where I share book photos and reels. Don’t forget to hit follow to stay updated on all my bookish posts.

Until the next chapter,
Bunny

The Reappearance Of Rachel Price // Book Review

About The Book
Eighteen-year-old Bel has lived in the shadow of her mother Rachel’s mysterious disappearance 16 years ago, of which she has no memory. Rachel, presumed dead, resurfaces during a true crime documentary, claiming an unbelievable tale. Unsure of its truth, Bel questions Rachel’s motives and the potential danger she poses. With cameras rolling, Bel embarks on a quest to uncover why Rachel returned and the secrets she may harbor.
Buy The Book: https://amzn.to/3Rtgz89

My Rating


This book had me hooked from start to finish. The complex plot and unexpected twists kept me intrigued until the very end. Imagine your mom showing up after sixteen years – would you trust her? That’s the dilemma facing Bel, the main character, as she navigates who to believe and trust. It’s a gripping story that kept me on the edge of my seat.

One thing I loved about this book is how it keeps you guessing the whole time. Every chapter brings new surprises, making me wonder what’s going to happen next. I did get a bit frustrated with Bel since she always has her guard up and finds it hard to trust others, but the story is so gripping that it kept me interested with its compelling mystery.

The fact that there’s a documentary being made about Rachel’s disappearance and sudden return adds a really interesting twist to the story. It gives a whole new perspective on what’s happening, and I found it super captivating. Some might think it’s not needed, but for me, it made the mystery even more exciting.

“Making people leave her before they chose to go anyway. Same result in the end, because everybody left eventually, but it hurt less. That was what life was, choosing the way that hurt less.”

The book includes a bit of romance, but it’s mostly about Bel growing and learning to connect with someone. It’s not the main focus, so it doesn’t dominate the plot. However, it does add depth to her character and makes the story more meaningful. Personally, I enjoyed Bel’s love interest, Ash, even though he’s not the main character. Their differences made their relationship really enjoyable.

Jackson’s talent as a writer truly stands out in this book, with plenty of unexpected twists and a jaw-dropping ending that left me—and will surely leave other readers—stunned. While it might not surpass her earlier works, this book is a thrilling mystery that showcases Jackson’s knack for crafting engaging and emotionally resonant stories.

Overall, there were times when the story slowed down and the pacing wasn’t quite right, but the book ends with a deeply satisfying and intense conclusion. It has all the elements I look for in a great YA thriller – mystery, suspense, and plenty of emotionally powerful moments. If you love books that keep you captivated until the very last page, this one is definitely worth picking up.

In the comments, let me know if you have read this book. Don’t forget that you can like and share this post with other readers. Show your support for my blog by giving it a follow.

Until the next chapter,
Bunny