As Good As Dead // Book Review


Synopsis
“She’s used to online death threats in the wake of her viral true-crime podcast, but she can’t help noticing an anonymous person who keeps asking her: Who will look for you when you’re the one who disappears? Soon the threats escalate and Pip realizes that someone is following her in real life.”


*This review might include information that some might see as a spoiler.*

Before I get started, I would like to mentally prepare you for a rant filled, and quite lengthy, review. (Although most of my reviews do seem to be pretty long). This is the third and final book in the ‘Good Girl’s Guide To Murder’ series – and when I say it was a disappointment, I mean it was a complete and utter fail! I was positively enraged by this book. So much so, that I don’t even want to write about it.

Nevertheless, here we are. The book takes place right after the second installment. So, if you have yet to read the second book, please be aware of spoilers. Pip is struggling with PTSD, which she isn’t actually dealing with at all. She has turned to using drugs, and insists on carrying the weight of the aftermath of ‘Good Girl, Bad Blood’ all by herself. It is clear that Pippa has changed in so many ways. Not only was her drug use shocking, she was a much darker version of herself.

For someone that seems so smart, she was totally blind to her self destructive behavior. And similarly, to to the fact that the only way to move past trauma is to deal with it head on. The rest of the characters stayed practically the same, and Ravi was both supportive and protective of Pip.

What makes this book so different than the previous two, is that the case involves Pippa herself. Before this, we have seen her trying to solve mysteries for others. This time, she is the target. The big question of the book is, “Who will look for you, when it’s you who goes missing”? It is a very interesting question, and, I think we all have our own answer to it.

The key to these books is that you have to remember all the little details. This final book connects all the books together. It is seriously a full circle moment. I loved how everything tied in together. Also, how Andy Bell had a nice redemption arc.

“All these ambiguities, these contradictions, these grey areas that spread and engulfed all sense – how could Pip rectify that? How could she cure herself from the after effects?”

This case follows a serial killer, rather than a solo murder – think of a Criminal Minds sort of case. However, the plot was none too thrilling to me. Also, it was strange to see Ravi being more involved in the case, and being smarter than Pippa at times.

I had many suspicions as to the killer, but kept bouncing around. Still, my first instinct was ultimately correct. And, by the halfway point, the book picked up the pace. It was an intense roller coaster ride from that point forward. However, right as the story got good, I was completely in shock as to what I was actually reading. I didn’t even recognize these characters. It was as if Pippa had no moral compass at all. And, everyone was so quick to jump right on board with her.

It was insane – I wanted to throw the book in the trash. I was livid! Okay, maybe I’m overreacting. But this book was unnecessary, and the characters developed in the worst way possible. I understand not trusting the justice system, but Murder, then framing someone else for that murder? Come on. Let’s face it, Pippa’s actions in this book prove that PTSD is the least of her issues.

However, something that I do love is that Holly Jackson’s book are easy to get into. She has a style of writing that I have become a fan of. And, as I have mentioned multiple time that even though the book got my blood boiling I couldn’t stop reading.

Overall, I wasn’t very satisfied with the the conclusion of the book or the trilogy altogether. My favorite book would have to be the first in the series, with book two being a close second. It really should have been a duology. However, I have noticed that this book has polarized opinions – you either love it, or you hate it. There really isn’t any middle ground. Can you guess which team I’m on?

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

Good Girl, Bad Blood // Book Review


Synopsis
Jamie Reynolds has disappeared, on the very same night the town hosted a memorial for the sixth-year anniversary of the deaths of Andie Bell and Sal Singh. The police won’t do anything about it. And if they won’t look for Jamie then Pip will, uncovering more of her town’s dark secrets along the way… and this time everyone is listening. But will she find him before it’s too late?


The first book in this trilogy was fantastic, so I was eager to jump into second book. Unfortunately, I had forgotten a lot of the characters from the first book, so it made this book a bit of a challenging read. However, I did find an overview of ‘A Good Girl’s Guide To Murder’ at Recaptains.

Unlike the first book, I wasn’t captivated from the start. I wasn’t sure about the whole friend’s missing brother plot. A missing persons case is very different from a murder/mystery. Still, Pippa is a fearless protagonist with a curious personality. Even with her reservations about taking on another potentially dangerous case, she can’t say no. It’s like they say: “A tiger can’t change it’s stripes”.

Although, the mystery was interesting, and I was enjoying all the twists, the plot wasn’t as thrilling as the previous book. But as the plot progressed, the pace picked up, and the story continued to get better. For me, a part of the reason I wasn’t as engaged as I thought I’d be, is that I felt like Pippa had changed since the first book. But, that is to be expected, given the life and death situation that she went through.

In this book, Pippa and Ravi are in a relationship, but I am unsure of how I feel about them being together. They had cute moments, but I didn’t sense a ton of chemistry between them. That aside, I do think they work well together. Ravi is very supportive of Pip’s inquisitive nature, while still being protective of her.

There was this new podcast element, and a lot more social media references. There are mentions of Instagram and Tinder. Authors tend to love throwing in bits of the real world like that, Maybe to connect with their readers more?

By the halfway point, I couldn’t put the book down. I felt like Pip. Trying to piece everything together, and my suspicions were even right a few times. And, when everything unfolded at the end, I was shocked, but not surprised at where the story went.

“I think we all get to decide what good and bad and right and wrong mean to us, not what we’re told to accept. You did nothing wrong. Don’t beat yourself up for other people’s mistakes.”

There was a lot of talk about the justice system, and how it fails more often than not. I think the justice system isn’t always so black and white. The way this book handles right and wrong is very powerful. It is an interesting take on justice and makes you take a closer look at your own beliefs.

The ending was incredibly sad, and begs the topics of what makes a victim. Should the sins of our parents become ours as well? By the end of the book, I sympathized with both the killer and victim. The ending was done so well, and was very thought provoking. In fact, the entire book will leave you with a lot to think about.

This book does show how much hypocrites people can be. It is always interesting to see just how easily people can turn on others. This is a real life thing, and makes you wonder why the world is full of so many judgmental individuals. Do genuine friends even exist?

Overall, I found it to be a great sequel. The storyline didn’t disappoint me one bit, and my reading experience was a positive one. Give this post a quick like and a share before you go. Also, did you know you could follow my blog? That really does help it grow, and reassures me that you like my content.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny