Book Review: The Project by Courtney Summers

*This review might include information that some might see as a spoiler.*

Title: The Project
Author: Courtney Summers
Published: 2021
Rating: 4.0/5.0 Stars

Synopsis: It’s good to be Chloe Wynn Berringer–at least, it was, until the FBI came knocking on her front door, guns at the ready, and her future went up in smoke. Now her mother is under arrest in a massive college admissions bribery scandal. Chloe, too, might be facing charges, and even time behind bars. The public is furious, the press is rabid, and the US attorney is out for blood.
Source: GoodReads

I feel at a lost for words to describe my thoughts on this book. I went into this book expecting a dark mystery thriller, but this story was much more. I would classify this as a psychological thriller that shines a light on cult lives and their leaders. The story kept me guessing at every turn, and although I didn’t love the plot Courtney Summers still managed to make me invested in story. At times, I was angry at Lo for how naïve she was, but I was also upset with her sister Bea for abandoning love for the The Unity Project.

There were times that I understood Lo’s frustration and need for love. I understood Bea’s need to find something, anything to believe in. As Lo and Bea both fell in love with Lev, I too fell for Lev’s charm and wanted to believe in his kindness. Make no mistake he is the villain of this story, but the author does a wonderful job of portraying him in such away that you want to believe in what he is selling. However, that is the thing about sociopathic sadist they no how to manipulate people and the narrative to their liking. They prey on the wounded, lonely, and the weak.

“For that brief period when everything ugly is covered under the sparkle of something so new, the world almost feels like it’s living up to its potential.”

Some of the chapters where a bit painful to read and heartbreaking. This story doesn’t wrap-up into a happy little bow. Their isn’t a true happy ending. I feel sadness for Lo and Bea. This is a story that cannot be explained and isn’t for everyone. It isn’t much of a mystery, but does keep you guessing. I wouldn’t call it a new favorite, but it is memorable. The book is categorized as young adult genre, yet I would say that it is more new adult. I would be interested in picking up other works from this author in the future.

I hope you liked this review, and want to mention that the book does deal with abuse, abandonment and tragedy. You can visit booktriggerwarnings.com to see warnings for many other books. Please like and share this post with other books lovers. Don’t forget to follow the blog to get notified when I post.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

Book Review: Time Of Our Lives by Emily Wibberley & Austin Siegemund-Broka

  1. Title: Time Of Our Lives
    Author: Emily Wibberley and Austin Siegemund-Broka
    Published: 2020
    Rating: 2.5/5.0 Stars

Synopsis: Time Of Our LivesWhen Fitz and Juniper cross paths on their first college tour in Boston, they’re at odds from the moment they meet– while Juniper’s dying to start a new life apart for her family, Fitz faces the sacrifices he must make for his. Their relationship sparks a deep connection–in each other’s eyes, they glimpse alternate possibilities regarding the first big decision of their adult lives.
Source: GoodReads

I was dreading writing this review, because not to long ago I was singing the author duos prayers. I was very unhappy with this book, and couldn’t get behind the plot. I was hoping for a cute boy meets girl type of story, but that is not really the premise. Are two leads are both college seniors, Fitz and Juniper, who cross path during their multiple college tours. The characters are different, yet similar. Fitz is very dedicated to taking care of his ill mother and has a strained relationship with his older brother. Juniper wants nothing more than to get space from her tight-knit family and has her college life mapped out.

When various chance meetings draw them together they start to develop feelings that become hard to ignore. This sound like a cute opposites attract book in which they both end up learning something from one another, right? Wrong! Well, kind of. Here is the kicker and a major faux-pas within the plot, Juniper has a boyfriend. Yep, they had been going strong for about a year and started the college road trip together. This was a twisted I never saw coming, and didn’t enjoy.

For me, Juniper was a very unlikable character determined to runaway from her family, because they were overbearing. I wanted to shake her and tell her that you don’t need to push your family away to live your dreams. However, I might be projecting, since I have a close-knit family. She was very stubborn at times, and always tried to push her ideas, opinions and the way she lived her life on to other. It got frustrating quickly. Needless to say, I didn’t enjoy reading her dialog.

“It’s extraordinarily freeing.”

Fritz on the other hand was hands down the redeeming part of this book. He was quirky, thoughtful and awkward. I loved that he was willing to give up all his dreams for his mom, and make new goals for her sake. I enjoyed the moments between him and his brother, and you could see the distance between them. However, you could tell that they did love each other even if at times they tried not to care.

I didn’t find Fritz and Juniper a believable couple at all. I couldn’t get over the fact that Juniper kept pushing her wants on the Fritz and essentially peer-pressuring him to-be like her. Maybe, I interrupted her wrong, but her personality was a bit abrasive. I felt like Juniper didn’t learned anything from Fritz, or change throughout the book. Their were small moments that you could see her personality shifting, yet they didn’t last long.

As for Fritz, his character growth was amazing! He discovered that he could live his life for himself while still caring about and for his mom. He learned that his brother cared just as much, maybe even more, than him about their family, but tried to play it cool. During the story, they came together as brothers and it was very touching. Is it sad that I would rather have had a strained brother road trip story instead of the one we got.

This book fell middle of the road for me, which isn’t bad but isn’t great either. I will continue to read whatever these two publish next, yet I might be keeping my expectations low. I want to add that there might be an epilogue in this book, but it isn’t in the e-book or audiobook versions, so I’m confused. I didn’t get a chance to read the epilogue, since I primarily read the formats I mentioned that didn’t contain it. Let me know your thoughts on this book in the comments.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

Book Review: Bookish and the Beast by Ashley Poston

Title: Bookish and the Beast
Author: Ashley Poston
Published: 2020
Rating: 3.0/5.0 Stars

Synopsis: When Rosie and Vance’s paths collide and a rare book is accidentally destroyed, Rosie finds herself working to repay the debt. And while most Starfield superfans would jump at the chance to work in close proximity to the Vance Reigns, Rosie has discovered something about Vance: he’s a jerk, and she can’t stand him. The feeling is mutual. But as Vance and Rosie begrudgingly get to know each other, their careful masks come off—and they may just find that there’s more risk in shutting each other out than in opening their hearts.
Source: GoodReads

I am happy to-be done with this series of companion novels but Ashley Poston. I started this series on a high note with Greekerella, but than it slowly went down hill. I wasn’t a fan of the second book in the series, and I’m sad to say this one fell short for me as well. I am a Beauty and the Beast fangirl and delighted to see a version of the story in the Once Upon a Con world. Unfortunately, I soon realized that I had too high of hopes for this book.

Rosie and Vance barely had any interaction, and no chemistry. Honestly, I would much have preferred to see their first meeting and watch their relationship build from their on. They would both talk about their first meeting and the instant connection they had, but during their present interactions I didn’t buy it. Also, Vance’s nobody understands me act was quite off-putting. He was seeking action by acting out, which was immature.

As for Rosie, she was the typical I’m “not like other girls” female lead. Her mother had passed away and they both shared a love of book, mainly the Starfield novels. I want to point out that I don’t think Rosie was a horrible character, but I am not a fan of that character type in books. The book did have character that were part of the LGBTQ community, which I love to see. However, the side characters played a very small part in the story.

“Books are not really just books at all, but doorways. They are portals into places I’ve never been and people I’ll never be.”

Frankly, I feel like she tossed these characters in, so that she could say the book diverse. I believe at one point they mentioned in passing that her father was bisexual and he was obviously developing a crush on Vance’s manager, he might not have been his manager, but I digress. I feel like her father being a bisexual was completely out of the blue, and a random add in. However, I would love a book on her father and possible falling in love with a woman and man, or a trans character.

Overall, I didn’t think that the love story was believable, the main characters were irritating to say the least and I could scream about what she did to Darien and Elle’s relationship. Also, only two other characters from the earlier books showed up in this one, which was lame in my opinion. I bet you can tell that this book wasn’t for me. In total, I would give the entire series a 3.5 start, but save yourself the time and read only “Geekerella.

I will note that there is a novella in the series, which I have yet to read. A safe bet is that I probably won’t be reading. Please share and like this post all your book loving friends. Follow the blog to get notified when I post.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

Book Review: If I’m Being Honest By Austin Siegemund-Broka and Emily Wibberley

Title: If I’m Being Honest
Author: Austin Siegemund-Broka and Emily Wibberley
Published: 2019
Rating: 5.0/5.0 Stars

Synopsis: When she puts her foot in her mouth in front of her crush, Andrew, she fears she may have lost him for good. In an attempt to win him over, Cameron resolves to “tame” herself, much like Katherine in Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew. First, she’ll have to make amends with those she’s wronged, which leads her to Brendan, the guy she labelled with an unfortunate nickname back in the sixth grade.
Source: GoodReads

When I read the synopsis of this book, I pictured a slow-burn enemies to lovers story. I imagined a Regina George type character who would become reformed. However, you know the saying “Don’t judge a book by its cover” well this book proves that you shouldn’t judge a book by the first few chapters.

I was going to dnf this book around 30 pages in, but I stuck it out, and I am glad. This book is much more than a love story. It is about change and forgiveness. I loved that throughout the story Cameron was focused on changing her ways for a guy, yet learned that self-perception is more important. She realized that honesty isn’t always the best policy, and being truthful could do more damage than good.

“I know the truth can hurt, even when you need to hear it.”

The love story was adorable and devolved in a very natural way. It was less enemies-to-lovers, but instead opposites attract. However, my favorite part of the story was Cameron’s home life and relationship with her parents. She sees her mother as weak and broken, while she paints this image of her dad as successful and strong. While she hates the way her absent father treats and talks to her and her mother. His negative outlook has clouded her opinion on her mother.

At the end, Cameron learns of her mothers love and strength. I think that it is the start of an amazing mother, daughter bond. To give a weird, yet accurate description of the novel. It is like an onion, there were many layers that unfold throughout the story. I am very happy to give this a five-star rating. Please share and like this post, and follow the blog.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

Book Review: Admission by Julie Buxbaum

Title: Admission
Author: Julie Buxbaum
Published: 2020
Rating: 3.0/5.0 Stars

Synopsis: It’s good to be Chloe Wynn Berringer–at least, it was, until the FBI came knocking on her front door, guns at the ready, and her future went up in smoke. Now her mother is under arrest in a massive college admissions bribery scandal. Chloe, too, might be facing charges, and even time behind bars. The public is furious, the press is rabid, and the US attorney is out for blood.
Source: GoodReads

When I saw this book on display at my local Wal-Mart I thought the concept was very intriguing. I, like many people, have heard about the college admissions scandal that rocked the media back in 2019. When the events of the scandal unfolded I knew that it was only a matter of time before their was some form of fiction about the affair. However, a YA book wasn’t my first thought. I went into this book with very low expectations, and knowing it would be very cliché.

The characters in the book don’t have much depth to them, and we are seeing the entire misconduct through the eyes of the main protagonist, Chloe. There were many jabs and similarities to the original scandal, which was fun to see. A good subject that the book touched on was how people are so quick to turn their backs on one another. Chloe’s friends and crush didn’t think twice before writing her off as a liar and cheater. They never once asked to hear her side of the story. What her family did was wrong nobody is denying that fact. However, their lack of loyalty to their so-called friend said a lot about them. I think it was a very honest portrait of friendship.

“I think about all the things money can and cannot buy.”

I did get slightly annoyed with many of the characters and how clueless they acted. It was as if they thought everyone got into college this way. In a majority of the book Chloe played dumb, which was frustrating but proved that she was not ready for college. The overall ending message about throwing money at your problems was very real. The author made it clear that yes money can buy you a lot even admissions to college, but that doesn’t make it right. Just because you can have something doesn’t mean you should. Most things in life should be earned, and not taken.

I am glad that I picked this book up, but it isn’t anything to write home about. I probably won’t read it again, still it was a very fast easy read. I would be interested to see a TV movie version of this book. If you have read this book please leave me your thoughts in the comments below. Also, follow the blog to get notified when I post.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

Book Review: The Thousandth Floor By Katharine McGee

Title: The Thousandth Floor
Author: Katharine McGee
Published: 2016
Rating: 4.0/5.0 Stars

Synopsis: Amid breathtaking advancement and high-tech luxury, five teenagers struggle to find their place at the top of the world. But when you’re this high up, there’s nowhere to go but down.
Source: GoodReads

The first description I got of this book was a sci-fi Gossip Girl, and being a GG lover I knew that I had to pick it up. However, I found the book to be a futuristic version of Pretty Little Lairs. The book is the first in a trilogy that follows multiple characters that live in the same apartment building. Although, they do not all come from élite families all of their stories intertwine, and they all have their own secrets.

I was hooked from the first chapter and couldn’t put the book down. There was so many twist and turns that kept me engage. The characters were very well written, and I wanted everyone to get a happy ending even though I knew that wasn’t possible. I did think something were a little cringe worthy, but I do think that the books covered the more taboo talks well. The story deals with incest, obsession, drugs and social class.

“I believe in happiness. I’m just not sure love will actually get you there.”

The ending was probably the most shocking part of all. I did not see it coming one bit, and was on the edge of my seat the entire time. It was sad, dark and fascinating. I know that a lot of people aren’t a fan of this book, but I adored it. It was my first science fiction novel, and I am glad that I decided to give it a chance.

I tried not to give too much away in this review, so I hope that I didn’t spoil anything. I would love for you to share this post with your bookworm friends. Please like the blog to get notified when I post.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

Book Review: The Princess and the Fangirl by Ashley Poston

Title: The Princess and the Fangirl
Author: Ashley Poston
Published: 2019
Rating: 3.0/5.0 Stars

Synopsis: When a case of mistaken identity throws look-a-likes Imogen and Jess together, they quickly become enemies. But when the script for the Starfield sequel leaks, and all signs point to Jess, she and Imogen must trade places to find the person responsible.
Source: GoodReads

This book is part of a companion series, Once Upon a Con, where each book follows different characters, but all the books connect. This story is a “Prince and the Pauper” retelling, which is one of my favorite stories. However, the book didn’t live up to my expectations. I didn’t enjoy the characters from this book nearly as much as the first, and the plot wasn’t as interesting.

Now this story is less of a love story, unlike book one, and more of a self-discovery plot, which could have contributed to my dislike of the book. Nevertheless, the over all plot wasn’t excited and the main characters weren’t very enjoyable to read about. I feel that the writing and story was a bit sloppy and not full fleshed out. I did like the side characters that were introduce, and seeing the characters from the first book was a nice treat.

“I am a nobody, but I’m a nobody who wants to leave the world a little brighter than when she arrived.”

Honestly, my favorite part of this book was the love story that developed between one of the main characters. It was a very real and sweet bond they created that turn into more. Also, I think it was an unexpected LGBT romance that was very well written. Overall, the book was pretty cheesy at time and did let me down, since it read more like a middle grade than young adult. However, I will probably be picking up the next book in the series, since it was decent read just not one that I would recommend often.

I do have a review up on Geekerella by Ashley Poston that you can check out as well. Please like and share this post with all your book loving friends. Don’t forget to follow the blog to get notified when I post.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

Book Review: Geekerella by Ashley Poston

Title: Geekerella
Author: Ashley Poston
Published: 2017
Rating: 4.0/5.0 Stars

Synopsis: Geek girl Elle Wittimer lives and breathes Starfield,

the classic sci-fi series she grew up watching with her late father. So when she sees a cosplay contest for a new Starfield movie, she has to enter. The prize? An invitation to the ExcelsiCon Cosplay Ball, and a meet-and-greet with the actor slated to play Federation Prince Carmindor in the reboot. With savings from her gig at the Magic Pumpkin food truck (and her dad’s old costume), Elle’s determined to win…unless her stepsisters get there first.
Source: GoodReads

When I picked up this book I didn’t know much about it besides that it was a Cinderella retelling. I am not the biggest Cinderella fan, but I had heard good things about this book. Also, I am a sucker for retellings of all kinds. This is the first in a series of companion books, which means each book follows different characters that are connected. I was obsessed with this story from the start and couldn’t put it down, which makes for a great reading.

I liked reading about Elle and how she felt out-of-place within her family after her father’s death. She wasn’t a brat or negative despite her circumstances. I understand that she had a hard time letting people in since she has been hurt before. It was nice to see her passion for Starfield and the connection she had with it because of her parents. Also, Her being a blogger made me smile.

“Look to the stars. Aim. Ignite.”

The love interest of Darien was great, and he was probably my favorite character. He was so naïve and kind, yet charming at the same time. He didn’t let his fame consume him and had his own personal struggles. It found his text messaging relationship with Elle very cute, because they got to know each other on a deeper level. Honestly, it reminded me a little of how I met my husband, thank you Tumblr.

I enjoyed the side characters in the book as well, and I liked the friendship that blossomed between Elle and her co-worker, Sage. The story showed that people shouldn’t be judge by who they are, and we are never really alone even if it feels that way sometimes.

I wouldn’t call this one of my new favorite books, but I did enjoy it and looking forward to reading the author’s other works. Let me know if you are have read this book and your rating in the comments below. Please support my blog by liking and sharing this post. As always you can follow the blog to get notified when I post.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

Book Review: You Should See Me In A Crown by Leah Johnson

Title: You Should See Me In A Crown
Author: Leah Johnson
Published: 2020
Rating: 5.0/5.0 Stars

Synopsis: Liz Lighty has always believed she’s too black,
too poor, too awkward to shine in her small, rich, prom-obsessed midwestern town. But it’s okay—Liz has a plan that will get her out of Campbell, Indiana, forever: attend the uber-elite Pennington College, play in their world-famous orchestra, and become a doctor. But when the financial aid she was counting on unexpectedly falls through, Liz’s plans come crashing down, until she’s reminded of her school’s scholarship for prom king and queen. There’s nothing Liz wants to do less than endure a gauntlet of social media trolls, catty competitors, and humiliating public events, but despite her devastating fear of the spotlight she’s willing to do whatever it takes to get to Pennington.
Source: GoodReads

I am a huge fan of YA contemporaries. I would go as far as to say they are my favorite genre to read, so when I heard about this book from multiple Booktubers and book bloggers I knew I had to pick it up. The main character of Liz is not only POC, but part of the LGBTQ community. She has overcome the death of her mother, her brother’s chronic illness and anxiety all while living with her loving grandparents who are struggling to get by paycheck to paycheck.

Liz’s life was very relatable, and though I don’t deal with all her struggles I understand her anxiety and fears about not affording college. The main character has such amazing growth, which didn’t happen all at once, but progressed naturally throughout the the book. She ran for prom queen with the hopes of getting a scholarship and nothing more, yet it turned into something greater. She set free a part of herself that she was too sacred to show and learned to stand up for her rights. I feel that the anxiety representation was done well and I connected with her fear of other’s opinions.

“I’m so tired of the way this place treats people who are different, tired of feeling like I exist in the margins of my own life. I deserve better than that.”

She did face friendship struggles, which was probably my least favorite aspect of the story. I enjoyed the fact that she reconnected with an old friend, still I wish that it showed how friends change and grow apart especially at a young age. Instead it went another route, which was completely fine just not my favorite. Also, there was some major conflict between Liz and her best friend that was mended by the end of the book. However, I feel as though it was resolved rather quickly and there wasn’t much closure to it.

The romance was one of my favorite aspects of the book. It was so cute! Of course the girls go through some ups and downs, but you cannot deny how adorable they are together. I will say that the romance had an instant love feel, but probably very relatable to high-schoolers. I have never been to high school, home schooler here, still in every teen movie there is an instant crush. The love interest was a perfect contrast to Liz since she was outspoken and quirky, and helped Liz come out of her shell.

Someone compared this book to a 90s teen movie and I completely agree. I got all those classic teen romances flick feels that I love so much. If you are in the mood for a super cute contemporary than I recommend you give this one a chance. I hope that you liked this review and please let me know your thoughts on this book. If you want to support me please share and like this post. Also, follow the blog to get notified when I post.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny