Fame, Fate and the First Kiss // Book Review

About The Book
Lacey Barnes has dreamed of being an actress for as long as she can remember. So when she gets the opportunity to star in a movie alongside one of Hollywood’s hottest actors, she doesn’t hesitate to accept the part. But Lacey quickly learns that life in the spotlight isn’t as picture perfect as she imagined.
Buy The Book: https://amzn.to/3DCtxsn

My Rating


This is a companion story to Kasie West’s  ‘Love, Life and the List,’ but this time we follow Lacey. In the first book, we learned that Lacey was an actress at the high school and by the end of the book just book her biggest role yet. In this book, we follow Lacey as she is taking on that breakout role.

Lacey was a good main character, and it was interesting reading about a newbie actress. Her character was outgoing and friendly, and super dedicated to her craft. However, she did get offended quite easily especially when it came to the subject of her career choice. Also, I struggle with the fact that her dad wasn’t very supportive of her career, yet I did understand that he was just trying to protect her. In all honesty, actors don’t have the best job security.

As for the romance, when Lacey meets her tutor, Donavan, she thinks he’s uptight. But, there are more sides of Donavan that we get to see, in time. We learned that he loved to write, and didn’t care for fame or social status. The chemistry between them was instant, and their relationship formed naturally. It was a bit of an opposite track type romance though.

“I love stories. I love watching them play out and trying to guess the endings. I love being surprised and learning new things about people or about myself.”

Within the story, we get to see Lacey struggle with feeling replaced in her life back at home. It isn’t a huge part of the story, but the sentiment that coming home isn’t always easy was a nice addition to the more lighthearted story. Lacey learned that going after your dreams means having to make sacrifices and if your passion is worth everything you have to give up.

There is this funny twist involving Donavan and another actor, which I did predict. But I liked how it was added to the story. It was a small touch that connected Donavan to Lacey’s world a little more. Also, there is a ton of witty batter in this book! Kasie West always writes the most charming characters with some of the best dialog.

Overall, this is a cute YA contemporary that is easy to read in one sitting. The story was well throughout and the romance was sweet. Although, I don’t know if I see Lacey and Donavan lasting long-term, but I have high hopes they’ll stay together.

Let me know in the comments below if you enjoy the opposite track trope. Don’t forget to follow my blog for more bookish content.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

Related Post: Love, Life and The List // Book Review

A Taste for Love // Book Review

About The Book
For fans of Jenny Han, Jane Austen, and The Great British Baking Show, A Taste for Love, is a delicious rom com about first love, familial expectations, and making the perfect bao. Both high school senior Liza Yang and her mother share a love and talent for baking but disagree on the subject of dating, especially when Mrs. Yang turns her annual baking contest into a matchmaking scheme.

My Rating


This book sounded like a cute YA contemporary with a baking element. The main character, Liza, is an Asian-American teenager that has been compared to her older sister Jeanie for years. Her sister is a New York model and college student, while Liza, on the other hand, is a typical teenage girl with dreams of being a baker.

Liza is a respectable main character that doesn’t want to be controlled by her parents, mainly her mother. I understood Liza’s annoyance with her mothers constant need to set her up with upstanding Asian boys, and slight digs at her appearance and choices. The books take on Asian parents is similar to how they are portrayed in Claire Ahn’s ‘I Guess I Live Here Now’, which I have also reviewed. Liza’s mother is constantly telling her that she needs to focus on school, and trying to find her a suitable Asian boy to marry. She even goes so far as to tell her daughter that ‘true love’, so to speak, is a work of fiction.

I wasn’t a fan of how her mother treated her. She put her daughter down, and had no real faith in her. She even body-shamed her, which is not acceptable for anyone, especially a parent, to do. However, she did this all under the pretense that she was just trying to help, and was worried about her daughter’s future. On the flip-side, Liza’s father was kind, and understood Liza’s desire to figure out her own path, which was a nice contrast to her mother.

Although Liza was the main focus of the story, there were many other characters that played a big part within the plot. Her sister, Jeanie, was her confidant, and had her own struggles that Liza was a bit too blind to see. Her best friend, Grace, was a find character, but I felt as though her relationship plot happened way too fast.

“Maybe because I don’t want the guy I date to sound like a walking college application.”

I liked the addition of Liza’s friend Sara, since she tended to put her foot in her mouth a lot. She said a lot of ignorant things about Asian culture, but she acknowledged her fault, and even made it a point to say that her words never come out right. It is a very honest portrayal of a person that might say insensitive things, but without malicious intentions.

There is a baking contest in the book, but I felt that not only did the contest happen rather far into the book, it was way too long. Truthfully, the contest wasn’t as engaging as I hoped it would be, but maybe I would have felt differently if it had been more of a focus from the start.

The romance was good, but not my favorite, since I was hoping for an enemies-to-lovers type of story. It was more of an accidental encounter turned more. And even though somebody leaves a bad first impression, they deserve a second chance. Although, I didn’t think Liza and James had the greatest chemistry, and he did some frustrating things throughout the book.

James claimed to like Liza, but was willing to turn on her without even an explanation, which rubbed me the wrong way. He was older than her, but immature, and should have had the guts to talk to her before walking away.

Overall, the plot was interesting enough, and the writing was nice. My biggest problem was that I didn’t have the urge to pick the book up. I can usually finish contemporaries fairly quick, but there was just something about this book that didn’t grip me. I found that I was having to force myself to read it, which doesn’t make for a good reading experience. The moral of the story, no pun intended, is that this book just wasn’t for me.

Let me know In the comments if you’ve ever read a book that you just didn’t care for. And after you comment, hit the follow button, because I would love to have you join my bookish community!

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

Related Posts: I Guess I Live Here Now // Book Review

I Guess I Live Here Now // Book Review


Synopsis
“A journey to the place where trends are born–Seoul, Korea–where Melody Lee unwillingly moves with her family and must start a new life, a new school…and maybe a new romance.”


This was a book that had been on my radar since I first heard about it. However, I am not generally interested in found family type of stories, but I decided it was worth a try. The main character is Melody Lee, and she is in for a culture shock when she must pack up and move from New York City to Seoul, Korea.

For the most part I liked Melody’s character. She was strong, funny, and opinionated, which to me are pretty good traits. However, like all characters, she had some bad qualities as well. She put her foot in her mouth a lot of the time, and thought she was so different from everyone else. Honestly, she wasn’t that special.

There was some self discovery on Melody’s part, and, by the end of the book, she had learned to embrace her Korean heritage. The story was very character driven, so it was nice that we learned a lot about who Melody was as a person, as well as all the side characters.

However, the characters names all sounded similar, so I had a hard time keeping up with who was who. But I did appreciate that there was some LGBT representation in the book,which I wasn’t expecting.

It was interesting to see how the parents in the book treated their kids. I am not sure if this is how Koren parents are, but they expected a lot from their kids. They acted like school should be your number one priority, your dreams should be realistic and marriage, in a sense, should be arranged.

From the moment Melody arrived in Seoul, her father was introducing her to boys that came from good families. Her dad was strict and uptight, and her mother was very passive throughout most of the book. I could never sit back and conform to these type of rules – especially since most of the parents set such high expectations for their children.

“Oh boy, kiddo. You’ll be changing until the day you die, and not just from moving across the globe, but from smaller things—like a new home or growing older—and from bigger things—like having a family of your own one day or losing loved ones.”

There was a romance within the story that I found to be cute. Yet, I didn’t like how Melody was so hot and cold with her crush. Give the poor boy a break! Still, I did see the chemistry between the two characters.

Also, I loved how the author described Seoul. It made me want to visit it for myself one day! The author’s writing as a whole was great, so I am looking forward to reading more from them.

For me, the moral of the story was that it is okay to dream, and that change is good. Sometimes, we discover a new side to ourselves, but that doesn’t mean we are an entirely new person. A lot of the time in books, characters are so afraid of change, but this book showed that we should welcome change, at least if it’s a change for the better, of course.

Overall, if you are looking for a YA contemporary that is essentially ‘The Princess Diaries’ with a twist, then you’ve found it. In the comments, leave me your thoughts on this book. Please feel free to follow my blog, and share this post too!

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

Most Anticipated Book Releases // July – December 2022

Hi Friends,
Back in December of 2021, I posted my most anticipated releases from January to June of 2022. Now, I will be sharing my most anticipated book releases from July to December of 2022. As usual, I am not going to mention all the books that I am excited for (since that will make this post very long). With that in mind, I am only mentioning the books that I am the most excited for.


Frightmares by Eva V. Gibson (July 5th)
“In a Florida tourist trap, a summer acting job turns into a real-life horror show when a cast member turns up dead—then disappears. This nail-biting story is perfect for fans of Fear Street!”

A Heavy Dose of Allison Tandy (A Heavy Dose of Allison Tandy #1) by Jeff Bishop (July 12th)
“You’ve Reached Sam meets John Hughes in a funny and heartfelt debut about a boy’s delirious summertime quest with his ex-girlfriend.”


Long Live the Pumpkin Queen by Shea Ernshaw (Aug. 2nd)
In my Mid-Year Book Freakout Tag that I cannot wait for this book to be released. I don’t think there has ever been a ‘Nightmare Before Christmas’ retelling, so this is going to be great. I have such high hopes for this book, which makes me a bit nervous.

12 To 22: POV You Wake Up in the Future! by Jen Calonita (Aug. 16th)
“A smart and funny modern day 13 Going on 30 from New York Times bestselling author Jen Calonita! A tween girl finds out it is like to be 22 when she jumps in time with the help of a mysterious TikTok filter.”

Nothing More to Tell by Karen M. McManus (Aug. 30th)
“Four years ago someone got away with murder. The most terrifying part is that they never left.”


Wishtress by Nadine Brandes (Sept. 13th)
“Everyone seems to need a wish—the king, Myrthe’s cousin, the boy she thinks she loves. And they’re ready to bully, beg, and betray her for it. No one knows that to grant even one wish, Myrthe would pay with her life. And if she tells them about the curse . . . they’ll just kill her anyway.”

Mere Mortals by Erin Jade Lange (Sept. 27th)
“This hilarious, fresh take on a classic vampire tale follows a pair of hundred-year-old teenage vampires who are turned mortal and must face the greatest nightmare of all—high school.”


Pretty Dead Queens by Alexa Donne (Oct. 4th)
“Seaview High’s homecoming queen is dead . . . and she’s not the first. From the critically acclaimed author of The Ivies comes a nonstop thriller about a decades-old mystery, a copycat killing, and the teen who won’t stop until she discovers the truth.”

The Art of Insanity by Christine Webb (Oct. 11th)
“Written from experience, this contemporary YA is a heartfelt and candid exploration into the shame surrounding mental illness and offers an uplifting narrative where the protagonist doesn’t die at the end.”


Friends Like These by Jennifer Lynn Alvarez (Nov. 1st)
“Twisted secrets that will have readers guessing with every flip of the page. Perfect for fans of GONE GIRL, WE WERE LIARS and Karen M. McManus. An end-of-summer party. A prank gone wrong. A body on the beach. Who’s to blame?”

Whiteout by Various Authors (Nov. 8th)
“Atlanta is blanketed with snow just before Christmas, but the warmth of young love just might melt the ice in this novel of interwoven narratives, Black joy, and cozy, sparkling romance—by the same unbeatable team of authors who wrote the New York Times bestseller Blackout!”


Come Out, Come Out, Whatever You Are by Kathryn Foxfield (Dec. 6th)
“On the reality show It’s Behind You!, five contestants competing for prize money must survive the night in the dark and dangerous Umber Gorge caves, rumored to be haunted by the Puckered Maiden, a ghost who eats the hearts of her victims. But is it the malevolent spirit they should fear, or each other?”

So, This Is Love (So, This Is Christmas #2) by Tracy Andreen (Dec. 20th)
“In the sequel to Tracy Andreen’s debut romantic comedy So, This Is Christmas, we follow Finley and Arthur back to Barrington Academy for a swoony semester.”


I always get overwhelmed talking about new book releases, since my TBR is already over 500 books! Reader problems, am I right? What are some new releases are you looking forward to? Don’t forget to follow my blog to get notified whenever I post. I am sure to be doing book reviews on at least some of these books.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

The Lucky List // Book Review

SynopsisEmily’s always been lucky. Well, technically her mum was the lucky one, and since she died, Emily’s started to feel like her luck’s run out. So when Emily finds her mum’s senior-year bucket list, she finds twelve ways to feel close to her again. But if she wants to check everything off, she’ll need help – help in the form of Blake. As Blake and Emily work through the list, the girls’ bond deepens. Emily is starting to feel lucky again, but she’s faced with the question: can she accept this new part of herself, the part her mum never even knew existed?


This isn’t a story that captured me right from the start, but I could tell that it would only get better. The main character, Emily, is going through a lot. She’s still coping with the passing of her mother., and trying to understand her feelings about grief, while trying to fix a mistake she made because of that grief.

Emily embarks on this journey to complete this list she found in her mother’s stuff. The author made a story about grief, into a story about self discovery. It made the subject not quite so heavy, but without glossing over the struggles of losing someone.

In the book, Emily starts bonding with the new girl, Blake. As they get closer, their feelings for each being to grow. The female/female romance was simple and sweet. Their relationship developed organically, and wasn’t rushed. Blake never pressured Emily into anything, and only wanted her to be happy.

Self love was a big part of the story, as quite a few of Emily’s decisions were based on what she thought her mother wanted for her. But the bucket list, of sorts, really did help her realize that sometimes you have to let heart take charge.

There was some focus on how we all grieve differently, but I wasn’t too found of the aspect. Emily’s dad was quick to “erase” his wife from their lives and move on. However, it was explained,that to him, her memory is what was more important. Her clothes and other things were just a reminder of what was lost.

“We’re all lucky,not because every thing works out, but we get to wake up in the morning and take chances and make mistakes and keep trying not to.”

I understand and respect the writer’s decisions to add that with in the story, but it made me angry all the same. However, it is true that once you are gone, you don’t leave things behind. Just people. As long as they don’t forget you, then you will always be with them.

Nevertheless, the story was well done, but slow at parts. I was hoping for more from it, which left me a bit disappointed. As for the the writing style, it was reminiscent of Sarah Dessen, who isn’t necessarily a writer I enjoy reading. I liked the way this story played out, so the writing didn’t bother me that much.

Overall, the plot was wrapped up with a nice little bow, and even with the topic of grief, there wasn’t too many heartbreaking moments. I would, of course, still recommend you go into the book knowing that loss is a major plot point of the story. Most of the book centers around the aftermath of losing a loved one.

In the comments, give me your thoughts on the book. Or, let me know if you have it on your TBR. As always, follow my blog, because it really brightens my day!

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

Beach Reads // Book Recommendations

Hi Friends,
Summer is approaching, and that means it beach read season! I have a few books already picked out to read this summer, and I can’t wait to dive into them. So, I thought I would give you all some books to add to your summer TBR.

The Summer I Turned Pretty‘ by Jenny Han
Yep, I am jumping on the bandwagon, and recommending this trilogy to you all. Although I don’t find it nearly as good as Jenny Han’s ‘To All The Boys’ trilogy, it is still a decent summer read. The book follows a girl named Belly (short for Isobel) who spend every summer at a beach house with her mom and brother, along with her mom’s best friend and her two sons, Jerome and Conrad. This summer, Belly isn’t the little girl she once was, and finds herself in a love triangle with Jerome and Conrad. It is a classic YA contemporary about growing up and first love. But I just could never get behind the nickname Belly. It is being turned into an Amazon Prime series, set to be released on June 17th, so now would be the perfect time to read the books.

Sunkissed‘ by Kasie West
If you know anything about me, than you know that I am an avid Kasie West reader. In my opinion, she writes some of the best young adult contemporaries. However, this book wasn’t my favorite. I do still think it is a good summer read, though. The book follows Avery, who is forced to spend the summer with her parents and sister at a family fun camp. Throughout the summer, Avery starts to connect with the camp staff, notably Brooks. As she and Brooks grow closer through their shared love of music, Avery beings a journey of self discovery. The story was cute, but I did have some issues with it. Still I do think a lot of people will enjoy this book. I mean with a title like ‘Sunkissed’ you instantly think beach read.

Butterfly Sisters‘ by Jenny Hale
This is an adult romance and sisterhood book. If you’re fans of second chance romances, small towns, and family relationships, then this is the book for you. The story follows Leigh as she must return to her family cabin, at her mother’s request. Being back at the cabin floods Leigh with the memories of her late grandmother. To make matters worse, she runs into the boy who she let got away, Colton. As if that wasn’t enough, on top of everything else, she is dealing with a strained relationship with her younger sister Meredith. Everything, from the lake side setting to the romance, gives you all those summer romance feels. Although, the romantic side to the story was sweet, the book focus more on family. It is a story about a family bond, and rebuilding some of those relationships.

Cool For The Summer‘ by Dahlia Adler
This book is perfect for those looking for a sapphic teen romance. Lara’s return to school becomes complicated when her longtime crush starts to take an interest in her. Right when Jasmine, whom she had a summer romance with, becomes her new classmate. The book alternates between Lara’s summer with Jasmine, and the present day. We get to see the two girls grow closer, as well as the reason for their now strained relationship. It was a simple and sweet YA contemporary, with not too much spice. It’s also an easy read, that you could probably finish in one day. Also, ‘Cool For The Summer’ is the title of a Demi Lovato song, which some have said is her version of ‘I Kissed A Girl’ by Katy Perry.

These are my summer book recommendations, but I am sure there are plenty more great summer reads out there. In the comments, let me know what you will be reading in the coming months. If you want to help my blog grow, hit that follow button!

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

Snow In Love // Book Review

Author: Melissa de la Cruz, Aimee Friedman, Nic Stone and Kasie West
Published: 2018
Genre: YA/Holiday

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Synopsis
What’s better than one deliciously cozy, swoon-worthy holiday story? Four of them, from some of today’s bestselling authors. From KASIE WEST, a snowy road trip takes an unexpected detour when secrets and crushes are revealed. From AIMEE FRIEDMAN, a Hanukkah miracle may just happen when a Jewish girl working as a department store elf finds love. From MELISSA DE LA CRUZ, Christmas Eve gets a plot twist when a high school couple exchange surprising presents. From NIC STONE, a scavenger hunt amid the holiday crowds at an airport turns totally romantic.So grab a mug of hot cocoa, snuggle up, and get ready to fall in love.


One thing you might not know about me, is that I love Christmas! I know that is pretty cliché, since most people say that Christmas is their favorite holiday. But, my absolute favorite thing about the season is the movies, books, and music. This book is a collection of short YA contemporary stories set during the holidays.

“Get her a gift. Take it to her. I know that’s more than a casual conversation but it’s less than asking her out. It’s just an ‘I’ve been thinking about you.”

Once I saw that Kasie West was a part of the collection, it was just an automatic read for me. The first story was conveniently written by Kasie West, titled ‘Snow and Mistletoe’. This story gave me classic contemporary feels, which is what this author does best. If follows a girl that joins a group of former classmates on a journey to get home in time for Christmas. I found it simple and cute, but the plot was rather predictable. The romance was obvious, but it was still a heartwarming story.

“There’s a severe shortage of Hanukkah songs.”

Next up we have ‘Working In A Winter Wonderland’ by Aimee Friedman. I have read one other book by this author, and it was years ago. This story follows a girl who takes a job at a fancy department story, in order to earn some extra money for the holiday season. Her long time crush’s father happens to own that department store. This story was not my favorite, and the writing style wasn’t for me. I didn’t care for the characters or the plot. It seems as if the romance was an afterthought, and simply added because most YA contemporaries do feature some sort of romance element.

“It’s Christmas after all.”

The third story was titled ‘The Magi’s Gift’ by Melissa De La Cruz. This is a cute holiday contemporary about wanting to fit in, but learning that being yourself is more important. Also, as you could probably tell from the titles this story is a retelling of ‘The Gift Of The Magi’, which is a classic Christmas tale. It was a solid story, but in my opinion, it felt a little on the younger side of YA.

“Jesus, Mary, and Joseph.”

The final story was ‘Grounded’ by Nic Stone. It followed two teenage girls, who used to be friends, and now must reconnect on Christmas Eve while stranded at the airport. This book didn’t focus much on the holiday season, and could have really been set at any time of year. However, it was the most diverse of the stories, since it contained a female/female romance, and characters of color. I do appreciate the diversity, and would like to read more form this author.

Overall, my favorite story was Kasie West’s ‘Snow and Mistletoe’, but that is probably no surprise coming from me. I am still trying to figure out if I enjoy short story collections, but there are a few more that I wouldn’t mind reading. In the comments, let me know your favorite anthology. If you like my book reviews like and share this posts, and follow my blog.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

When You Get The Chance // Book Review

Author: Emma Lord
Published: 2022
Genre: YA/Contemporary
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Synopsis
Nothing will get in the way of Millie Price’s dream of becoming a Broadway star. Not her lovable but super introverted dad, who raised Millie alone since she was a baby or her drama club rival, Oliver, who is the very definition of Simmering Romantic Tension. Millie needs an ally. And when an accidentally left-open browser brings Millie to her dad’s embarrassingly moody LiveJournal from 2003, Millie knows just what to do – find her mum. But how can you find a new part of your life and expect it to fit into your old one without leaving any marks? And why is it that when you go looking for the past, it somehow keeps bringing you back to what you’ve had all along?


This is a ‘Mama Mia’ YA retelling, which wasn’t initially on my radar. But, being a fan of young adult contemporary and the Mama Mia movies I knew that I had to give it a read. Predictably, the plot revolves around our main character, Millie, who sets out to find her mom. However, I found Millie’s mom journey was coming from a place of selfishness. Millie is a Broadway star hopeful, who has been accepted to a fancy performing arts school. Her devoted single dad was less than thrilled about the idea of his teenager daughter leaving home to attend some school. The only reason Millie wanted to find her mom was to get a parent’s approval to attend the school. If that isn’t narcissistic, I don’t know what is. I guess it’s true what they say – it’s easier to ask forgiveness, than to get permission.

Although, I didn’t like Millie’s actions for most of the book, I understood that she was a just a teenager. From experience, I know that teenagers never listen to reason. Also, her father might have been a little quick to say no, and didn’t want to listen to what his daughter wanted. He reminded me a bit of my mother, because she would never go for me leaving home as a teen.

Millie was raised by not only her dad, but her aunt as well. However, I didn’t feel a strong family bond within the book. Sure, they talked about how close they all were, but we didn’t get to see much of the family relationships. I think the main issue that Millie had with her family, which could be another underlying reason for searching for her mother, was her dad and aunt’s inability to tell her anything about her mom. I understand that it was a hard subject, but there comes a time when you have to talk about the hard things. Millie deserved to know who her mother was.

Personally, I figured out who her bio-mom was about halfway though the book. However, it is a contemporary, so authors don’t typically make it hard to figure things out. The romance was an enemies-to-lovers, but I didn’t care for it all too much. I didn’t see the two having a real connection, but it didn’t hinder the story in anyway. There was a very cute side romance that I loved, which did make me enjoy the book a lot more.

“Two performers who know each other’s overblown, ridiculous hearts all too well.”

There were tons of pop culture references throughout the book, which a lot of people might not care for. However, I thought they were great. The book talked about Live Journal; oh the memories that brings back. Also Disney+, Spiderman, Stacy’s Mom, and so much. Millie was even a child internet star, which was a slightly weird addition to the plot, but very relevant in today’s world.

I did like all the potential moms, and understood why her dad fell for each of them. He was an introvert, and they all brought out different sides of him. You could see any one of them being Millie’s mom. Nevertheless, I don’t understand how someone could abandon their child. For me, that child would instantly be a part of my heart. But, I can see how that isn’t the case for everyone.

My opinions on abandonment aside, Millie’s mother wasn’t a villain for leaving her. She had her reasons, and whether one agrees with them or not, we shouldn’t judge anyone for their choices. The book’s message was to focus on what we have, rather than what we don’t, or what we want. The ending was my absolute favorite part, because it was very cute.

Overall, the book was a decent read, but not my favorite. It wouldn’t be the first book I recommend to people looking for a YA contemporary to read. I would have liked to see a gender-bent version of Mama Mia, where a son is looking for his biological mom. Hopefully we will get a story like that in the future. Let me know your thoughts on the book in the comments. And do follow my blog, because it would definitely make my day.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

The Way You Make Me Feel // Book Review

Author: Maurene Goo
Published: 2018
Genre: YA/Contemporary/Romance
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Synopsis
Clara Shin lives for pranks and disruption. When she takes one joke too far, her dad sentences her to a summer working on his food truck, the Honeycut, alongside her uptight classmate Rose Carver. Not the carefree summer Clara imagined. But maybe Rose isn’t so bad. Maybe the boy named Hamlet (yes, Hamlet) on the truck next door is pretty cute. Maybe Clara’s estranged mom deserves a second chance. What if taking these relationships seriously means leaving her old self behind?


Unfortunately for me, this book was a dud. The main character, Clara, wasn’t very likable. She was a prankster, and had a reputations of being a rebel. She wasn’t sneaking out late, or drinking under age, but she did whatever she wanted. Clara was very outspoken, and sometimes I found her to be too honest.

She had a single father and pretty absent mother. A lot of books follow single parents, but the difference with this book was that her parents were teen parents. I don’t find that a lot of books go for that angle. However, the fact that they were teenage parents wasn’t a big plot point. Also, her mother was a ‘social media star’, which I didn’t care for.

The main focus of the plot was Clara having to spend the summer working at her dads food truck with her nemesis, Rose. I actually found Rose to be much more enjoyable to read about. Something that annoyed me was Clara’s attitude about working in the food truck. I understand that she was looking forward to visiting her mom over the summer, and that she’s only a teenager, but she acted like working with Rose would be like going to jail.

However, throughout the book I saw Clara grow and learn. She formed a bond with Rose, and they learned a things from one another. Although, I am not a fan of stories where characters forget about their old friends, I do understand that people grow apart. But I felt like Clara was sort of ditching her old friends, instead of having a real conversation with them about their friendships.

There was a romance aspect, but it seemed rather rushed. I know that not all romances have to be slow burns, but let’s have an actual friendship start to form before a relationship happens. From the moment Clara and Hamlet met, she was kind of obsessed with her. She was jealous when she thought he liked Rose, which is crazy since they weren’t even a thing yet.

“The person who feels no fear in their heart when seeing a freaking clown in the flesh is probably a serial killer!”

I found them to be very clingy to one another, and I didn’t like that Hamlet didn’t respect Clara’s choices. There was a moment he used the ‘boyfriend’ title. She cleared stated she wasn’t ready for that, but did he listen? Nope. Also, who says ‘I love you’ after just a short while of dating? Especially as a teenager.

As for the father and daughter relationship, I found it very refreshing. Not a lot of books focus on the family side of things. It was very real that Clara was used to being the center of her father’s world, and her reaction to that changing was understandable.

There is a food truck competition within the story, but it actually played a pretty small part of the plot. Honestly, the author could have omitted it, and that wouldn’t have bothered me. Something I did enjoy, were the pop culture references throughout the book. They mentioned ‘Supernatural’, and hung out at ‘7/11,’ That, I found slightly weird. Do people do that?

Overall, the ending was predictable and happy. But all in all, the book was kind of forgettable, at least for me. It could be that I didn’t mesh with the writing style, and it felt like a younger YA contemporary. In the comments, let me know if you’ve read this book. And, before you go, please hit that follow button!

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny

Book Tropes // The Ones I Love

Hi Friends,
There are so many book tropes out there that I just love. Sure, there are ones that I am not a fan of, or I think they are over done. But, I pretty much enjoy a lot of common book tropes. I am such a basic reader. Anyhow, I thought it would be fun to share my favorite book tropes with you all.

Enemies-to-Lovers: This has to be my favorite trope of all. There is just something about to rivals that fall in love. I have never actually seen this play out in real life, and don’t really think it is a normal thing. However, in books, it works so well. At least it does most of the time. I’ve read a few books where the characters weren’t true enemies, or the relationship just didn’t work well. Still, despite being predictable, one of my favorite enemies-to-lovers is ‘P.S. I Like You‘ by Kasie West.

Bad Girl, Gone Good: I am not sure if this is a typical trope, or a trope at all. Yet, I enjoy books were there is a bitchy/mean girl character that changes for the better. Think Regina George becoming Lizzie McGuire. Okay, that might not be the best explanation for this trope, but I think you get what I mean. ‘If I’m Being Honest‘ by Austin Siegemund-Broka and Emily Wibberley is the perfect example of how to do this trope right. The book is one actually one of my favorite reads of 2021.

Fake Dating: I think that almost every romance reader can attest to the fact that this is one of the best tropes in books. For some reason, I cannot get enough of fake relationships. There is something adorable about a fake relationship, or relationship of convenience turning into something real. Instead of recommending one of my favorite, well known, fake dating stories, I will share one that I’m hoping to read, ‘The Upside of Falling‘ by Alex Light. This is from a Wattpad author and sounds like a sweet YA contemporary.

Forced Proximity: Every since I was a kid, plots where the characters are trapped somewhere always interested me. And, I am not talking about horror stories. When I think of this trope, the Dawson’s Creek episode when Pacey and Joey get stuck in a K-Mart always comes to mind. I believe that I have only ever read one stuck together book, but it was very enjoyable. The book was ‘By Your Side‘ by Kasie West in which a boy and girl get locked inside a library. How could a reader not love this plot?

Friends-to-Lovers: I was hesitant to put this on the list, because I am not sure of my feeling on the trope. I use to think I wasn’t a fan of friends-to-lovers stories, but my opinion of them has changed. Don’t get me wrong, it still isn’t an all time favorite trope of mine, but it is growing on me. After reading ‘How Not To Fall In Love‘ by Jacqueline Firkins, I can see myself reading more books with this trope in the future.

There you have the book tropes that I adore! I will most likely be doing a post on the tropes that I don’t like, because there are some that I cannot get behind. Leave a comment letting me know what your favorite trope is whether it is in movies or books. Also, like this post and share it with others.

Until The Next Chapter,
Bunny